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China warns over PM's Dalai meeting

28/05/201316:18(Xem: 1551)
China warns over PM's Dalai meeting

China slams PM meeting

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Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd and the Dalai Lama meet in Canberra yesterday.

Photo: Glen Mccurtayne

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Sarah Smiles
June 13, 2007

CHINA has reacted angrily to the Prime Minister's decision to meet the Dalai Lama later this week, implying that it could harm diplomatic relations.

In a thinly veiled threat issued just hours after John Howard said he would meet Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, a spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry called on Canberra to register Beijing's "strong dissatisfaction and staunch opposition" over the matter.

"The Dalai Lama is not a simple religious figure. He is a long-time political exile engaged in splittist activities and destroying national unity," Qin Gang told journalists in Beijing.

"We hope that the Australian government can deeply recognise this and proceed from the overall interests of maintaining healthy Sino-Australian relations and not allow the Dalai Lama to engage in splittist activities."

Mr Howard announced his decision to see the Dalai Lama as he visited Canberra yesterday as part of a national tour. The Buddhist leader received an unofficial reception in parliament where he highlighted China's human rights abuses in his native Tibet, and called on countries not to shy away from pressing Beijing about its plight.

He later met Federal Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd.

Both Mr Rudd and Mr Howard were initially reluctant to meet him. Mr Rudd changed his mind after Mr Howard accused him of hypocrisy having criticised Foreign Minister Alexander Downer for refusing to see him on a previous tour.

Mr Howard then indicated he was "checking his diary" on the possibility of a meeting, which he finally confirmed yesterday.

Mr Rudd said China's reaction was not surprising.

"I think that's a consistent reaction from Beijing wherever this happens around the world, whether it's the Dalai meeting with President Bush, President Clinton or Prime Minister Blair … obviously these are sensitive issues for the Chinese," he told ABC radio.

Yet Hugh White, a visiting fellow at the Lowy Institute said the strength of China's reaction suggested it was angry with the Government over other issues, including Australia's signing of a security agreement with Japan and quadrilateral security discussions between Japan, Australia, the US and India.

"It's very clear the Chinese have been very angry about the Japanese security agreement," he said. "I suspect the tone of their objection to the Dalai Lama probably reflects that deeper anxiety as well."

Mr Rudd said yesterday that he had postponed a trip to China that he had planned for later this month. His spokesman said the delay had nothing to do with his meeting with the Dalai Lama.

A spokesman for Mr Howard declined to comment on China's response.

With Michelle Grattan and AAP
http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/china-slams-pm-meeting/2007/06/12/1181414299988.html

Chinese warn ties in danger

Ben Packham

June 13, 2007 12:00am

Article from: Herald-Sun

CHINA has warned Australia the Dalai Lama's visit could harm bilateral ties.

Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd yesterday met the Tibetan spiritual leader, and Prime Minister John Howard has said he will also greet the Dalai Lama.

But China's foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang last night said his country had expressed "our strong dissatisfaction and staunch opposition to the Australian side for allowing the Dalai Lama to Australia to engage in splittist activities".

The Dalai Lama, 71, has led a Tibetan government-in-exile in India since 1959. China took over the Himalayan region in 1950.

China has bristled for years at the Dalai Lama's huge international following. He won the 1989 Nobel Peace Prize for his non-violent approach to handling relations with China.

Beijing has refused to allow him to return to Tibet, where he is revered as Tibetan Buddhism's highest spiritual authority.

The Dalai Lama poses a diplomatic headache for those anxious not to offend such a huge trading partner.

But the Buddhist leader said a true friend of China should be able to say if it is making mistakes on issues such as human rights and democracy.

"China must be in the mainstream of world community," he told the National Press Club.

"While you are making good relations, genuine friendship with China, there are certain principles such as human rights and also democracy . . . these things you should stand firm.

"So that means you are a true friend of China."

Mr Rudd, who last night said he had delayed his plans to visit China, had earlier declined to see the Dalai Lama and only relented when it appeared the PM would meet him, too.

The PM's office confirmed only yesterday that he would meet the elderly monk.

Mr Qin said the Dalai Lama was not a simple religious figure.

"He is a long-time political exile engaged in splittist activities and destroying national unity," Mr Qin said.

"We hope the Australian Government can deeply recognise this and proceed from the overall interests of maintaining healthy Sino-Australian relations and not allow the Dalai Lama to engage in splittist activities," Mr Qin said.
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,21896027-662,00.html

China warns over PM's Dalai meeting

China is warning Australia to reconsider a meeting between Prime Minister John Howard and the Dalai Lama, implying it could harm diplomatic relations.

Only hours after Mr Howard finally confirmed he would meet the exiled Tibetan religious leader, Beijing fired off a stern message that it wasn't impressed.

Mr Howard had been checking his diary for more than a month before his office finally confirmed that the prime minister would meet the revered religious leader.

"I think their paths will cross at some stage," a spokesman said.

Both Mr Howard and Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd have been wary of meeting the popular international figure, mindful of the potential to anger China - Australia's biggest trading partner.

Their fears appear to have been confirmed by China's angry response.

"We have expressed our strong dissatisfaction and staunch opposition to the Australian side for allowing the Dalai Lama to (come to) Australia to engage in splittist activities," foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang told journalists in Beijing.

Mr Howard's office was not immediately available for comment.

China accused the Buddhist monk of trying to spread an independence agenda for Tibet.

"The Dalai Lama is not a simple religious figure. He is a long-time political exile engaged in splittist activities and destroying national unity," Mr Qin said.

"We hope that the Australian government can deeply recognise this and proceed from the overall interests of maintaining healthy Sino-Australian relations and not allow the Dalai Lama to engage in splittist activities."

But the Dalai Lama told the National Press Club that Tibet wasn't seeking separation or independence - only autonomy - realising it made more economic sense to remain under China's wing.

Mr Rudd, who met the 71-year-old this evening, was not surprised by the Chinese reaction.

"I think that's a consistent reaction from Beijing wherever this happens around the world, whether it's the Dalai meeting with President Bush, President Clinton or Prime Minister Blair ... obviously these are sensitive issues for the Chinese," he told ABC radio.

The Dalai Lama, who was warmly greeted as he travelled around the national capital, had earlier been surprised at the interest the issue of a meeting with Mr Howard was generating.

"In the last few days ... the possible meeting with the prime minister, every news item always mentions that, in my mind it's not that serious but their mind it seems very, very serious," an amused Dalai Lama told the National Press Club.

"For my part, there is no particular agenda to discuss with the prime minister, so if I happen to have the opportunity to meet the prime minister, I can consider him an old friend because once I met (him)," the Dalai Lama told the National Press Club.

"I will be happy (if I can meet Mr Howard) but if not, it doesn't matter."

He urged Australia to use its influence with China to help smooth its transition into the mainstream of the world community.

"While you are making good relations, genuine friendship with China, there are certain principles such as human rights and also democracy, rule of law, free press, these things you should stand firm," he said.

"So that means you are a true friend of China.

"(But if) whatever, they've done, you say: 'Oh good, good, wonderful, wonderful,' then (the) Chinese themselves eventually lose their faith."


http://au.news.yahoo.com/070515/2/13gpy.html

Dalai Lama meetings anger China

A DIPLOMATIC row has erupted with the Chinese Government over the Dalai Lama's visit, with Beijing accusing Australia of supporting the 71-year-old exile's "splittist activities".

The strongly worded riposte from Chinese officials followed John Howard's decision yesterday to meet the Dalai Lama later this week.

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Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd and the Dalai Lama meet in Canberra yesterday.

The Chinese Government has steadfastly objected to Western governments recognising the Tibetan leader, regarding it as an interference in their internal affairs.

Soon after Mr Howard's decision yesterday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Beijing had warned Australia that it could not support such a meeting. "We have expressed our strong dissatisfaction and staunch opposition to the Australian side for allowing the Dalai Lama to Australia to engage in splittist activities," Mr Qin said.

He said the Dalai Lama was "not a simple religious figure".

"He is a long-time political exile engaged in splittist activities and destroying national unity," Mr Qin said.

"We hope that the Australian Government can deeply recognise this and proceed from the overall interests of maintaining healthy Sino-Australian relations and not allow the Dalai Lama to engage in splittist activities."

The Prime Minister's office has said several times over the past month that Mr Howard has been "checking his diary" to seewhether he would be able tomeet the Dalai Lama during his 11-day trip to Australia.

Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd, who met the Dalai Lama in his hotel yesterday, also announced last night that he would postpone a trip to Beijing scheduled for the end of this month to discuss climate change.

Mr Rudd, a former diplomat based in Beijing who has maintained close links with China, said he was considering "a range of possible dates into the future" for the trip. "We've been trying to co-ordinate times with our private sector participants and will be looking at alternative dates over the next several months," he said.

A spokeswoman for Mr Rudd said last night that the trip had been postponed after it emerged that key participants would not be available.

Mr Rudd's office would not say what was discussed during their meeting, but the Dalai Lama earlier said he hoped to persuade Mr Rudd to use his command of Chinese to press the case of Tibetan autonomy.

Mr Rudd had ruled out a meeting with the Dalai Lama, only to change his mind when Mr Howard said he was considering one.

The Dalai Lama addressed the National Press Club, where he repeated his call for religious harmony and "human values".

He urged Australia to be a "true friend" to China by standing up to it on thorny subjects such as human rights, democracy, press freedoms and the rule of law. "Remain firm, tell them, not negatively, but friendly."

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21896617-2702,00.html

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The Dalai Lama is in Bendigo today to bless the biggest Buddhist stupa in the Western world, which is under construction and due to be completed by 2010.

About 2000 people are in the central Victorian city to see the Tibetan religious leader give his blessing to the Buddhist religious monument.

The Dalai Lama, on his second day in Australia, was welcomed by the traditional owners of the land, the Jarra Jarra people, who took him through an Aboriginal smoking ceremony before he entered the stupa.

He also unveiled a four-metre high statue of Guru Rinpoche, the Tibetan saint who brought Buddhism to Tibet.

AAP

Dalai Lama talks about poverty, climate

The Dalai Lama has called on Australians to help reduce the gap between rich and poor and make environmental consciousness a part of their daily lives.

Tenzin Gyato, the 14th Dalai Lama, was speaking in Perth at the start of his 11-day tour of Australia, where he addressed a forum on sustainability and spirituality.

The exiled Tibetan leader told the crowd of several thousand people that humans wrongly think they can control nature when in fact humanity and the environment are interdependent.

The very survival of the earth depended on mankind taking care of the planet, he said.

"Taking care of the environment should be part of our daily life," the Dalai Lama said.

"Using cars, or using electricity, your water, every moment, keep in mind the preservation of energy and resources."

The Buddhist leader said the world's resources must be preserved for future generations.

"The present generation has the moral responsibility to keep sufficient resources for future generations," the exiled Tibetan leader told the crowd of several thousand.

"It is very important."

The Dalai Lama called on the media help raise public awareness of environmental issues, saying political leaders would then follow.

Just as important was the need to reduce poverty, he said.

"The gap between rich and poor is growing, it's huge," he said.

"This is not only morally wrong, but practically it's a source of the problem. We have to reduce this gap."

Virgin Blue chief executive Brett Godfrey, who also addressed the forum, said immediate action had to be taken on climate change.

The federal government needed to set greenhouse gas reduction targets, establish a carbon trading scheme and work with business on sustainable development, Mr Godfrey said.

The Dalai Lama will also give a free public talk on ethics in the new millennium before leaving for Victoria on Thursday.

In Bendigo, the Dalai Lama will bless the stupa, or Buddhist mound-like structure, being built outside the town, which when finished will be the biggest stupa in the western world.

During his tour, the Dalai Lama is due to meet Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd, whom he met previously in 2002.

Prime Minister John Howard has said he will check whether there is room in his itinerary.

Dalai Lama not fussed by snub

Exiled Tibetan religious leader, the Dalai Lama, says he's not bothered one way or the other if he is snubbed by Australia's political leaders during his 11-day visit.

The 71-year-old, wearing the traditional Tibetan maroon and gold monk's garb, said he has met the prime minister on a previous visit and if it was not to happen this time, "no problem".

In a 25-minute briefing with the media today, the 14th Dalai Lama said he did not know if a meeting with John Howard would eventuate.

"I hear some say there is a possibility and some say there is no possibility - I don't care," he said.

"If they find it too much of an inconvenience, no problem. I don't want to create inconvenience with anybody."

He agreed that Australia's trade with powerhouse China, which occupies Tibet and counts it as a part of greater China, may come ahead of a meeting with the Dalai Lama and the risk of upsetting the communist government.

"China is a very, very important country, and trade with China is certainly very important," the Tibetan Buddhist leader said.

"So there's no question that is why the prime minister finds it a little difficult (to meet with me) - that's understandable," he said.

The Dalai Lama said he was now in semi-retirement and Tibet had elected political leaders to carry on the struggle for autonomy.

"Our approach is not seeking independence (from China). We are seeking genuine autonomy to preserve Tibetan culture, Tibetan language and the Tibetan environment," he said.

He admitted Tibetan youth are becoming frustrated with the lack of progress in talks with Chinese leaders and feared that if nothing changed in the next 15 years, Tibet could be swallowed up completely.

"Tibetan youth are very frustrated and if the present situation is the same in 15 years then I think Tibet is finished," he said.

Asked for his opinion on stem cell research, the Dalai Lama said he was opened minded.

"Generally any scientific research work is good, provided the motivation and the goal are important," he said.

After the conference, the Dalai Lama was given a police escort to the Rod Laver Arena where he was due to address a multi-faith youth forum for more than 9000 Victorian secondary school students.

Dalai Lama speaks of indigenous inequity

The Dalai Lama says indigenous Australians are not treated as equally as the indigenous people of other countries.

Speaking at the National Press Club on Tuesday, the spiritual leader said indigenous people were more accepted in other countries.

"In New Zealand, the Maoris enjoy, I think, more equal status," the Dalai Lama said.

"In northern Scandinavian countries ... they speak Norwegian very good and they utilise modern facilities and they have their own parliament."

He also encouraged indigenous Australians to embrace modern facilities that are available to them.

"If I had the opportunity to meet some indigenous people then I would say to them please study ... meantime you should utilise some modern facilities including medical facilities."

Labor leader urged to help

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The Dalai Lama … meeting.

Photo: Eddie Jim

SUPPORTERS of Tibet's Dalai Lama want the Opposition Leader, Kevin Rudd, to do more than share a cup of tea when he meets the visiting spiritual leader in Canberra tomorrow.

They want Mr Rudd, who speaks Chinese, to discuss using his extensive contacts in Beijing to help Tibet achieve autonomy from Chinese rule.

In a letter to Mr Rudd, the chairman of the Australia Tibet Council, George Farley, wrote: "Given your own experience, expertise and interest in Chinese affairs, we look forward to the outcomes of your meeting with the Dalai Lama with great interest."

If Mr Rudd became prime minister he would be in a position to raise Tibet's future with Chinese leaders.

The office of the Prime Minister will not say whether John Howard will meet the Dalai Lama and offered no comment on the campaign for Tibetan autonomy or complaints about human rights in Tibet.

In the letter to Mr Rudd, Mr Farley says the Dalai Lama's approach would allow Tibet to remain part of the People's Republic of China.

China would be able to keep a limited number of soldiers in Tibet and would retain responsibility for political aspects of international relations and for defence.

The Australia Tibet Council also wants Mr Rudd to discuss with the Dalai Lama how China could be pressed on human rights issues, including in Tibet.

"Despite optimistic predictions made at the time that Beijing was awarded the Olympics, there has been little or no consistent progress made to date," Mr Farley said in the letter to Mr Rudd

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/labor-leader-urged-to-help/2007/06/10/1181414141867.html

Slim pickings for the political Dalai Lama

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Tibet will manage ... the Dalai Lama said yesterday Tibet could better handle its own environment and internal affairs.

Photo: AFP


SPIRITUALITY and secular politics overlapped in Canberra yesterday with the Dalai Lama in town, but hopes were dashed that Kevin Rudd, if he became prime minister, would press China over autonomy for Tibet.

The Opposition Leader has postponed indefinitely a trip to China pencilled in for this month. Mr Rudd, who was to take a delegation of frontbenchers and businesspeople, made the announcement last night before meeting the Dalai Lama.

The spiritual leader's visit was overshadowed by a warning China issued soon after the Prime Minister, John Howard, agreed to meet the Tibetan spiritual leader this week. Beijing said it could harm relations.

The Australia Tibet Council had written to Mr Rudd, who speaks Mandarin and was a diplomat in Beijing, asking him to help work towards achieving autonomy for Tibet, which was invaded by China in 1950.

But a spokesman for Mr Rudd said he would not - in opposition or in government - seek to play any direct role in Tibet's future.

Mr Rudd met the Dalai Lama at a Canberra hotel yesterday. "I've met the Dalai Lama as a major world religious figure, and our discussions centred on questions of religion and faith," he said.

In an address to the National Press Club in Canberra yesterday, the Dalai Lama said Tibetans would better manage their own environment and internal affairs, but China could retain control of foreign affairs and defence. "Just to suppress with more military is only a temporary answer," he said. "Our approach is not seeking independence, not seeking separation regardless of past history."

The Greens leader, Bob Brown, welcomed Mr Howard meeting the Dalai Lama.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/slim-pickings-for-the-political-dalai-lama/2007/06/12/1181414305877.html

dalailama-stevezoo

Wednesday June 13, 10:41 AM

Dalai Lama visits Steve Irwin's zoo

About 5,000 people have gathered at the late Steve Irwin's Australia Zooon Queensland's Sunshine Coast to hear the Dalai Lama talk about kindness to animals and the environment.

Monks at the 71-year-old exiled Tibetan spiritual leader's Dharamsala monastery are friends with the Irwin family.

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Terri Irwin and daughter Bindi have joined with the Dalai Lama at the talk, being held in the zoo's Crocoseum.

The Dalai Lama will also use the visit to launch Kindness Week, a community project initiated by Karuna Hospice Services designed to nurture the spirit of kindness.

On Wednesday afternoon about 15,000 people are expected to fill the Brisbane Entertainment Centre to hear the Dalai Lama speak on the issues of compassion and kindness.

The free tickets were snapped up within two days of becoming available.

Premier Peter Beattie confirmed he would not be meeting the Dalai Lama as he had business on the Gold Coast and will be meeting with visiting New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark.

But Queensland Governor Quentin Bryce will meet with the spiritual leader.

http://au.news.yahoo.com/070613/2/13qdt.html

Care for animals - Dalai Lama

Article from: AAP

June 13, 2007 12:29pm

THE Dalai Lama has used an appearance at Queensland's Australia Zoo to urge people to take better care of the world's animals.

Just under 5000 people packed the Crocoseum amphitheatre at the late Steve Irwin's zoo to hear a speech by the Tibetan religious leader.

The speech, part of the Dalai Lama's 11-day tour of Australia, was also attended by Terri and Bindi Irwin.

The exiled Tibetan leader's 50 minute address was dominated by the themes of environment and kindness to animals.

"It is a wonderful place to remind ourselves we are part of nature," the Dalai Lama said of the zoo.

"Taking care of animals is essential to developing more happiness in human beings."

The exiled Buddhist leader also encouraged the crowd to eat more vegetables and less meat.

While speaking about the need for compassion among humans, the Dalai Lama highlighted why he believes some people turn to terrorism.

"Most troublemakers on this planet, so called terrorists, if you investigate their whole life particularly at the time of childhood I think there is something lacking," he said.

"Therefore if we are to have a happier future ... ultimately most important is human compassion."

After receiving a standing ovation from the assembled crowd, Bindi Irwin appeared alongside the 71-year-old monk holding a koala.

"This is rather lazy, isn't it?" the Dalai Lama said of the koala.

"Lazy like myself."

The Dalai Lama was this afternoon to deliver a free public lecture at the Brisbane Entertainment Centre.


http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,21897976-661,00.html

Dalai Lama visits Irwin's Australia Zoo

Brisbane
June 13, 2007 - 10:50AM

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Cuddly: the Dalai Lama with, from left, Terry, Bob and Bindi Irwin and a koala.

Photo: AP

Latest related coverage

About 5000 people have gathered at the late Steve Irwin's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast to hear the Dalai Lama talk about kindness to animals and the environment.

Monks at the 71-year-old exiled Tibetan spiritual leader's Dharamsala monastery are friends with the Irwin family.

Terri Irwin and daughter Bindi today joined with the Dalai Lama at the talk, being held in the zoo's 'Crocoseum'.

The Dalai Lama will also use the visit to launch Kindness Week, a community project initiated by Queensland-based palliative care service Karuna Hospice Services.

This afternoon about 15,000 people are expected to fill the Brisbane Entertainment Centre to hear the Dalai Lama speak on the issues of compassion and kindness.

The free tickets were snapped up within two days of becoming available.

Premier Peter Beattie yesterday confirmed he would not be meeting the Dalai Lama as he had business on the Gold Coast and will be meeting with visiting New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark.

But Queensland Governor Quentin Bryce will meet with the spiritual leader.

Meanwhile, federal coalition MPs have dismissed criticism by the Chinese government of Prime Minister John Howard's decision to meet with the Dalai Lama.

Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd met with the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader yesterday and Mr Howard is expected to meet with him later this week.

The Chinese government has expressed "strong dissatisfaction" with the Australian government for holding meetings with the Dalai Lama during his 11-day tour of Australia.

West Australian Liberal MP Don Randall today backed Mr Howard's decision to meet the Dalai Lama.

"I met the Dalai Lama last time he was in Australia and I think he's an absolutely delightful person and we're not going to be stood over by the Chinese," Mr Randall told reporters.

"We don't ever get stood over by some foreign power, certainly not China."

Queensland Liberal MP Cameron Thompson said it was wrong of China to criticise Mr Howard and Mr Rudd for meeting the Dalai Lama.

"I'm glad that they did (meet him) because to a lot of Australians the Dalai Lama is a very important person," Mr Thompson told reporters.

"This guy's the Dalai Lama, it's just not right for a country to say to another, 'You shall not go and talk to that person'. It's just not right."

Australian Greens leader Bob Brown also supported the meetings and said Mr Howard should act as an "honest broker between China and exiled Tibetans".

"Many Australians would like to see John Howard take it a step further and become an honest broker between Beijing and the exiled Tibetans, to get the Tibetan wish for autonomy on the road and to resolve this issue which is now more than half a century old," Senator Brown told reporters.

AAP

http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/bindi-bags-a-lama/2007/06/13/1181414341920.html

Dalai Lama pays homage to "Crocodile Hunter's" zoo

AP, June 13, 2007

BEERWAH, Australia-- One of the world's most famous animal lovers visited the former stomping ground of another on Wednesday when the Dalai Lama toured the family zoo of late "Crocodile Hunter" Steve Irwin.


dalailama-stevezoo-bindi-2<< Crikey: Buddhism comes to the animals - Dalai Lama visits Australian Croc Hunter's zoo. By DENNIS PASSA - Associated Press Writer

Delicately handling a Burmese python and gingerly petting a frisky koala, the spiritual head of the world's Buddhists visited Australia Zoo and spoke to a sold-out crowd at its open-air, arena-style Crocoseum.

The last time the place was this full was nearly nine months ago during a memorial service for Irwin, the late host of the TV wildlife show "Crocodile Hunter" who died last September when the barb from a stingray pierced his chest while he was diving on the Great Barrier Reef. Dalai Lama thanked Irwin's family for their dedication to wildlife. At the same time, he used the occasion to criticize experimentation on animals and encouraged the 5,000-capacity crowd to become vegetarians.

"Hunting, beef, sheep farms, piggeries, millions, billions, die," said the Dalai Lama. "We can be so cruel to animals."

The hour-long tour of the zoo was a different experience for the Dalai Lama, whose 11-day tour has been politicized, as it often is when he is abroad, by lawmakers concerned about meeting the man China considers an exiled troublemaker.

After weeks of hedging, Prime Minister John Howard agreed to meet with the Dalai Lama on Friday. Howard is anxious not to offend the Chinese government too much because Australia's economy is closely tied to China's booming demand for natural resources and Australia's ability to supply them, but his government also staunchly defends Australia's democracy.

China, which rules Tibet with military force, has used diplomatic pressure to discourage governments from meeting with the Dalai Lama or otherwise showing him support. It immediately criticized Howard's decision to meet with the Tibetan.

On a sunny, but crisp winter morning, the Dalai Lama, with his long traditional red robe flapping in the wind, received a standing ovation as he came on stage at the Crocoseum. Some of the crowd waved Buddhist prayer flags that were purchased at concession stands that normally sell pellets to feed the kangaroos.

Seconds after the Dalai Lama began his speech, almost as if on cue, about a dozen Australian native birds, including black cockatoos and rainbow lorikeets, flew into the stadium.

"I think they were perhaps not ready to leave yet," the Dalai Lama said of the birds, to laughter from the audience.

But most of his off-the-cuff address Wednesday, officially to open "Kindness Week" to animals, was more serious as he criticized companies and organizations that "remain indifferent" to the rights of animals by experimenting on them.

He also spoke of the benefits of vegetarianism, and said he often used to buy animals to save them from slaughterhouses when he was a young man in Tibet.

The Dalai Lama's visit ended when American-born Terri Irwin, Steve's widow, and their children, Bindi and Bob, came on stage, with Bindi carrying a koala.

"He looks lazy, just like me," the Dalai Lama said before presenting the Irwin family with Buddhist scarves.

http://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=49,4297,0,0,1,0

Tibetan community welcomes Dalai Lama to Sydney

ABC News Online, June 14, 2007

Sydney, Australia-- Hundreds of people from Sydney's Tibetan community have turned out to welcome the 14th Dalai Lama at Sydney Airport.


dalailama-sydney2<< The Dalai Lama was greeted by hundreds of people at Sydney Airport (ABC News)

A long line of monks, Tibetans and well-wishers waited at the airport's arrival terminal this morning to welcome His Holiness.

Many in the crowd wore traditional dress, and held paper lotus flowers - a sign of compassion and peace.

As the Dalai Lama entered the arrivals foyer, the crowd fell silent and bent down to greet the man described as 'a living God.'

After greeting the crowd, he told a news conference that embracing what he calls "human values" is the key to emotional and physical wellbeing.

"When I say human values, not necessarily with religious faith, but I usually call "secular ethics" such as warm-heartedness and sense of community," he said.

During his stay in Sydney, the Dalai Lama and a number of speakers from Australia and overseas will appear at the International Conference on Happiness and Its Causes.

He will meet John Howard tomorrow afternoon, despite the Prime Minister saying earlier that he would not hold talks with the spiritual leader.

His Holiness will also be a guest at Friday's One Earth Tribute Concert in the Domain.

The Dalai Lama will be in Sydney for three days before heading to New Zealand.

Young people 'turning to spirituality': Dalai Lama

By Alyssa Braithwaite, AAP, June 14, 2007

Sydney, Australia-- GROWING numbers of young people are turning to spirituality as they realise they cannot inject, drink or purchase peace of mind, the Dalai Lama says.

dalailama-sydney2<< The Dalai Lama arrives in Sydney

The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader was greeted by about 100 people when he arrived in Sydney today to begin the final leg of his 11-day tour of Australia.

He laughed and offered blessings as he moved past the crowd, which included more than a dozen Buddhist monks in traditional robes and also Tibetan children in traditional dress.

The Buddhist leader said later that his No.1 commitment in the country was the promotion of human values and religious harmony.

"I consider meeting with the public as something useful because my main interest and my first commitment is promotion of human values," he said.

"When I said human value, not necessarily religious faith but ... secular ethics such as warm-heartedness and sense of community."

He said that in this age of celebrity and consumerism, more and more young people were becoming interested in what he had to say, because his message about creating a happy life was universal.

"I have nothing special to say, and I'm not a singer, I'm not special," the Dalai Lama said.

"But everybody, whether they are wealthy or poor, everybody wants a happy life, everybody wants a successful life and that is much dependent on peace of mind."

The best way to achieve a happy life, he said, was by ensuring that your mind was calm, through spirituality.

"More stress, more anxiety, more fear is the largest obstacle to happy life," he said.

"A calm mind is very essential. A calm mind you cannot (get) through injection, through buying."

The 71-year-old holy man, who fled into exile when China seized control of Tibet in 1959, said his other commitment was to Tibetan issues.

The Dalai Lama will give a free public talk tomorrow at The Domain, in central Sydney, to be followed by a concert.

http://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=49,4311,0,0,1,0

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10/04/201311:28(Xem: 5915)
Quyển “Phật Giáo Việt Nam và Thế Giới” (PGVNvTG) của Thiền sư [sic] Định Lực và Cư sĩ [sic] Nhất Tâm biên soạn [sic], được NXB Văn Hoá Thông Tin cấp giấy phép số 1715/XB-QLXB của Cục Xuất Bản ngày 11-12-2001, có mặt trên thị trường sách khoảng giữa năm 2003. Sách dày 632 trang, khổ 16x24 cm, được in trên giấy couche, bìa cứng, rất sang trọng. Sách được xuất bản theo dạng “đội mủ” của quyển “Tôn Giáo và Lịch Sử Văn Minh Nhân Loại,”
13/01/202010:29(Xem: 813)
Danh hiệu "TAM TẠNG" là một danh vị vô cùng cao quí được trao tặng cho các vị tỳ khưu chuyên sâu về Pháp Học được tuyển chọn từ 500.000 chư đại đức tăng thành viên của giáo hội Tăng già trên khắp nước Miến.
21/03/202018:31(Xem: 784)
Như thường niên, cứ đến tháng Tư âm lịch, mùa sen nở, mùa hoa Vô Ưu lại về, báo hiệu mùa Phật Đản. Cùng với hàng trăm triệu người con Phật trên khắp 5 châu, lòng tràn đầy hân hoan, đón chào ngày Đản sinh lần thứ 2.643 của đấng Từ phụ Thích Ca Mâu Ni, chúng ta cùng vọng hướng về Thánh địa Lâm Tỳ Ni, nơi Bồ tát thị hiện ra đời, thành tâm cúi đầu đảnh lễ và xưng tụng đại nguyện độ sinh cao cả của Đấng Thiên Nhân Sư.
16/03/201122:43(Xem: 1595)
Vì sao khi đức Đạt Lai Lạt Ma tuyên bố từ bỏ quyền lãnh đạo chính trị, Bắc Kinh lại nổi điên? Ngày 20 tháng Ba này, cộng đồng Tây Tạng trên thế giới sẽ bầu cử để chọn người lên làm Thủ tướng của Chính phủ Lưu vong Tây Tạng, có trụ sở tại thành phố Dharamsala miền cực Bắc Ấn Độ.
19/05/201614:52(Xem: 12060)
Bắt đầu từ ngày 06 tháng 4 năm 2016, cá biển tự nhiên và cá nuôi lồng bè của ngư dân ven biển chết hàng loạt, bắt nguồn từ khu kinh tế Vũng Áng (thị xã Kỳ Anh, Hà Tĩnh), lan xuống các tỉnh lân cận (Quảng Bình, Quảng Trị, Thừa Thiên-Huế, Quảng Nam-Đà Nẵng…) suốt dọc trên 200 cây số bờ biển. Ngay cả rạn san hô, “nhà ở” của các sinh vật dưới biển, cách bờ biển từ 1-6 hải lý, chạy dài từ đầu tỉnh đến cuối tỉnh Quảng Bình, cũng đã bị phá hủy trong các đợt cá chết vừa qua; san hô chết, nhiều sinh vật biển chết theo (theo báo cáo ngày 06.5.2016 của chính quyền địa phương thôn Nhân Nam, xã Nhân Trạch, huyện Bố Trạch, tỉnh Quảng Bình).
10/04/201312:19(Xem: 6228)
Nhằm mục đích giúp cho những bệnh nhân vào thời kỳ cuối của bệnh ung thư sống những ngày tháng cuối cùng của cuộc đời một cách thanh thản, bình yên về mặt tinh thần cũng như tâm linh trên phương diện y tế được đón nhận sự chăm sóc một cách toàn diện về thân thể, tâm lý và xã hội. Vào ngày 8 tháng 8 năm 1996 Bệnh Viện Đa Khoa Từ Tế Phật Giáo ở Hoa Liên Đài Loan đã thành lập "AN NINH LIỆU HỘ BỆNH PHÒNG"chuyên môn chăm sóc những bệnh nhân thời kỳ cuối của bệnh ung thư và được Ni Sư Chứng Nghiêm (người sáng lập Hội Từ Tế) đặt tên là "Tâm Liên Bệnh Phòng".
10/04/201313:32(Xem: 6818)
Hôm nay là ngày 20 tháng 6 năm 2001 nhằm ngày 29 tháng 4 nhuần năm Tân Tỵ, tôi chắp bút bắt đầu viết quyển sách thứ 32 nầy trong mùa An Cư Kiết Hạ của năm nay. Hôm nay cũng là ngày rất đẹp trời. Vì mấy tháng nay, mặc dầu đã vào hạ; nhưng bầu trời vẫn vần vũ bóng mây, như dọa nạt thế nhân là ánh sáng của thái dương sẽ không bao giờ chan hòa đến quả địa cầu nầy nữa.
28/11/201023:24(Xem: 1502)
Ngày nay, các nhà nghiên cứu lịch sử võ học đều thừa nhận, Thiếu Lâm không những là cội nguồn của nhiều môn võ khác, mà còn được tôn xưng là Ngôi Sao Bắc Đẩu trong nền võ học.
10/04/201312:28(Xem: 8483)
Vào những năm cuối đời Ðông hán, sau khi Phật giáo truyền vào TQ, trải qua những năm chiến loạn của các triều đại như Tam quốc, Tây Tấn 16 nước và Nam Bắc triều, trong chiến tranh và khổ nạn như thế, Phật giáo đã truyền bá 1 cách nhanh chóng. Các lịch đại vương triều, từ việc giữ gìn, bảo vệ chiếc ngai vàng của mình lâu dài vững mạnh, đã biết áp dụng, lưïa chọn chính sách bảo vệ và đề xướng giáo lý Phật giáo. Do vậy, chùa chiền và số lượng tăng chúng không ngừng tăng thêm.
07/07/201120:06(Xem: 15289)
Lời Ban Biên Tập: Nhằm mục đích góp phần giúp thế hệ trẻ Việt Nam ở trong nước cũng như ở hải ngoại biết rõ lịch sử Việt Nam trong năm 1963 xảy ra như thế nào và nhất là để có nhận thức sâu sắc hơn về điều mà dân tộc đã khẳng định: “Phật giáo Việt Nam với dân tộc như hình với bóng, tuy hai mà một”. Cho nên chúng tôi lưu trữ vào Thư Viện Hoa Sen CÁC BẢN DỊCH TỪ KHO DỮ LIỆU BỘ NGOẠI GIAO, BỘ QUỐC PHÒNG, CƠ QUAN TÌNH BÁO TRUNG ƯƠNG & CÁC NGUỒN KHÁC đã giải mật. Các tư liệu này có liên quan đến sự kiện lớn trong lịch sử Việt Nam hiện đại. Sự việc này chắc chắn sẽ có những ý kiến ủng hộ và chống đối, nhưng lịch sử vẫn là lịch sử. Ban biên tập website Thư Viện Hoa Sen chân thành cảm tạ nhà văn Cư sĩ Nguyên Giác, Cư sĩ Nguyễn Kha, và Nhà Xuất Bản Thiện Tri Thức Publications đã gửi tặng các phiên bản vi tính điện tử và trân trong giới thiệu đến toàn thể quý độc gỉa trong và ngoài nước.