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Meghiya Sutta

20/03/201415:36(Xem: 2333)
Meghiya Sutta

Khuddaka Nikaya
---o0o---

Udana

Exclamations

---o0o---

Udana IV.1

Meghiya Sutta

About Meghiya

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying among the Calikans, at Calika Mountain. At that time Ven. Meghiya was his attendant. Then Ven. Meghiya went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, stood to one side. As he was standing there he said to the Blessed One, "I would like to go into Jantu Village for alms."

"Then do, Meghiya, what you think it is now time to do."

Then in the early morning, Ven. Meghiya, having put on his robes and carrying his bowl and outer robe, went into Jantu Village for alms. Having gone for alms in Jantu Village, after the meal, returning from his alms round, he went to the banks of the Kimikala River. As he was walking along the banks of the river to exercise his legs, he saw a pleasing, charming mango grove. Seeing it, the thought occurred to him: "How pleasing and charming is this mango grove! It's an ideal place for a young man of good family intent on exertion to exert himself in meditation. If the Blessed One gives me permission, I would like to exert myself in meditation in this mango grove."

So Ven. Meghiya went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One, "Just now, in the early morning, having put on my robes and carrying my bowl and outer robe, I went into Jantu Village for alms. Having gone for alms in Jantu Village, after the meal, returning from my alms round, I went to the banks of the Kimikala River. As I was walking along the banks of the river to exercise my legs, I saw a pleasing, charming mango grove. Seeing it, the thought occurred to me: 'How pleasing and charming is this mango grove! It's an ideal place for a young man of good family intent on exertion to exert himself in meditation. If the Blessed One gives me permission, I would like to exert myself in meditation in this mango grove.' If the Blessed One gives me permission, I would like to go to the mango grove to exert myself in meditation."

When this was said, the Blessed One responded to Ven. Meghiya, "As long as I am still alone, stay here until another monk comes."

A second time, Ven. Meghiya said to the Blessed One, "Lord, the Blessed One has nothing further to do, and nothing further to add to what he has done. I, however, have something further to do, and something further to add to what I have done. If the Blessed One gives me permission, I would like to go to the mango grove to exert myself in meditation."

A second time, the Blessed One responded to Ven. Meghiya, "As long as I am still alone, stay here until another monk comes."

A third time, Ven. Meghiya said to the Blessed One, "Lord, the Blessed One has nothing further to do, and nothing further to add to what he has done. I, however, have something further to do, and something further to add to what I have done. If the Blessed One gives me permission, I would like to go to the mango grove to exert myself in meditation."

"As you are talking about exertion, Meghiya, what can I say? Do what you think it is now time to do."

Then Ven. Meghiya, rising from his seat, bowing down to the Blessed One and circling him to the right, went to the mango grove. On arrival, having gone deep into the grove, he sat down at the foot of a certain tree for the day's abiding.

Now while Ven. Meghiya was staying in the mango grove, he was for the most part assailed by three kinds of unskillful thoughts: sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill will, and thoughts of doing harm. The thought occurred to him: "How amazing! How awesome! Even though it was through faith that I went forth from home to the homeless life, still I am overpowered by these three kinds of unskillful thoughts: sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill will, and thoughts of doing harm." Emerging from his seclusion in the late afternoon, he went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One, "Just now, while I was staying in the mango grove, I was for the most part assailed by three kinds of unskillful thoughts: sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill will, and thoughts of doing harm. The thought occurred to me: 'How amazing! How awesome! Even though it was through faith that I went forth from home to the homeless life, still I am overpowered by these three kinds of unskillful thoughts: sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill will, and thoughts of doing harm.'"

"Meghiya, in one whose release of awareness is still immature, five qualities bring it to maturity. Which five?

"There is the case where a monk has admirable people as friends, companions, and colleagues. In one whose release of awareness is still immature, this is the first quality that brings it to maturity.

"Furthermore, the monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior and sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults. In one whose release of awareness is still immature, this is the second quality that brings it to maturity.

"Furthermore, he gets to hear at will, easily and without difficulty, talk that is truly sobering and conducive to the opening of awareness, i.e., talk on having few wants, on contentment, on seclusion, on non-entanglement, on arousing persistence, on virtue, on concentration, on discernment, on release, and on the knowledge and vision of release. In one whose release of awareness is still immature, this is the third quality that brings it to maturity.

"Furthermore, he keeps his persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful [mental] qualities and for taking on skillful qualities. He is steadfast, solid in his effort, not shirking his duties with regard to skillful qualities. In one whose release of awareness is still immature, this is the fourth quality that brings it to maturity.

"Furthermore, he is discerning, endowed with the discernment of arising and passing away -- noble, penetrating, leading to the right ending of stress. In one whose release of awareness is still immature, this is the fifth quality that brings it to maturity.

"Meghiya, when a monk has admirable people as friends, companions, and colleagues, it is to be expected that he will be virtuous, will dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior and sphere of activity, and will train himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

"When a monk has admirable people as friends, companions, and colleagues, it is to be expected that he will get to hear at will, easily and without difficulty, talk that is truly sobering and conducive to the opening of awareness, i.e., talk on having few wants, on contentment, on seclusion, on non-entanglement, on arousing persistence, on virtue, on concentration, on discernment, on release, and on the knowledge and vision of release.

"When a monk has admirable people as friends, companions, and colleagues, it is to be expected that he will keep his persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful qualities, and for taking on skillful qualities -- steadfast, solid in his effort, not shirking his duties with regard to skillful qualities.

"When a monk has admirable people as friends, companions, and colleagues, it is to be expected that he will be discerning, endowed with discernment of arising and passing away -- noble, penetrating, leading to the right ending of stress.

"And furthermore, when the monk is established in these five qualities, there are four additional qualities he should develop: He should develop [contemplation of] the unattractive so as to abandon lust. He should develop good will so as to abandon ill will. He should develop mindfulness of in-and-out breathing so as to cut off distractive thinking. He should develop the perception of inconstancy so as to uproot the conceit, 'I am.' For a monk perceiving inconstancy, the perception of not-self is made firm. One perceiving not-self attains the uprooting of the conceit, 'I am' -- Unbinding in the here and now."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Little thoughts, subtle thoughts,
when followed, stir up the heart.
Not comprehending the thoughts of the heart,
one runs here & there,
the mind out of control.
But comprehending the thoughts of the heart,
one who is ardent, mindful,
restrains them.
When, followed, they stir up the heart,
one who is awakened
lets them go without trace.

---o0o---

Udana IV.1

Meghiya Sutta

Meghiya

Translated from the Pali by John D. Ireland.

Thus have I heard. At one time the Lord was staying at Calika on Calika Hill. At that time the Venerable Meghiya was the Lord's attendant. Then the Venerable Meghiya approached the Lord, prostrated himself, stood to one side, and said: "I wish to go into Jantu village for almsfood, revered sir."

"Do now, Meghiya, what you think it is time to do."

Then the Venerable Meghiya, having put on his robe in the forenoon and taken his bowl and outer cloak, entered Jantu village for almsfood. Having walked in Jantu village for almsfood, after the meal, on returning from collecting almsfood, he approached the bank of the river Kimikala. As he was walking and wandering up and down beside the river for exercise, he saw a pleasant and charming mango grove. On seeing it he thought: "This mango grove is very pleasant and charming. It is eminently suitable for the endeavour (in meditation) of a young man of good family who is intent on the endeavour. If the Lord were to give me permission, I would come and endeavour in this mango grove."

Then the Venerable Meghiya approached the Lord, prostrated himself, sat down to one side, and said: "Revered sir, having put on my robe in the forenoon ... I approached the bank of the river Kimikala and saw a pleasant and charming mango grove. On seeing it I thought: 'This mango grove is very pleasant and charming. It is eminently suitable for the endeavour (in meditation) of a young man of good family who is intent on the endeavour. If the Lord were to give me permission, I would come and endeavour in this mango grove.' If, revered sir, the Lord gives me permission, I would go to that mango grove to endeavour (in meditation)."

When this was said the Lord replied to the Venerable Meghiya: "As we are alone, Meghiya, wait a while until some other bhikkhu comes."

A second time the Venerable Meghiya said to the Lord: "Revered sir, the Lord has nothing further that should be done and nothing to add to what has been done. But for me, revered sir, there is something further that should be done and something to add to what has been done. If, revered sir, the Lord gives me permission, I would go to that mango grove to endeavour (in meditation)."

A second time the Lord replied to the Venerable Meghiya: "As we are alone, Meghiya, wait a while until some other bhikkhu comes."

A third time the Venerable Meghiya said to the Lord: "Revered sir, the Lord has nothing further that should be done ... I would go to that mango grove to endeavour (in meditation)."

"As you are talking of endeavouring, Meghiya, what can I say? Do now, Meghiya, what you think it is time to do."

Then the Venerable Meghiya rose from his seat, prostrated himself before the Lord, and keeping his right side towards him, went to that mango grove. On entering that mango grove he sat down at the foot of a certain tree for the rest period during the middle of the day.

Now while the Venerable Meghiya was staying in that mango grove, there kept occurring to him three bad, unwholesome kinds of thoughts: sensual thought, malevolent thought, and cruel thought. The Venerable Meghiya then reflected: "It is indeed strange! It is indeed remarkable! Although I have gone forth out of faith from home to the homeless state, yet I am overwhelmed by these three bad, unwholesome kinds of thoughts: sensual thought, malevolent thought, and cruel thought."

Then the Venerable Meghiya, on emerging from seclusion in the late afternoon, approached the Lord, prostrated himself, sat down to one side, and said: "Revered sir, while I was staying in that mango grove there kept occurring to me three bad, unwholesome kinds of thoughts ... and I thought: 'It is indeed strange!... I am overwhelmed by these three bad, unwholesome kinds of thoughts: sensual thought, malevolent thought, and cruel thought.'"

"When mind-deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, five things lead to its maturity. What five?

"Here, Meghiya, a bhikkhu has good friends, good associates, good companions. When mind-deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, this is the first thing that leads to its maturity.

"Furthermore, Meghiya, a bhikkhu is virtuous, he lives restrained by the restraint of the Patimokkha, endowed with conduct and resort; seeing danger in the smallest faults, he trains in the training rules he has accepted. When mind-deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, this is the second thing that leads to its maturity.

"Furthermore, Meghiya, a bhikkhu obtains at will, with no trouble or difficulty, talk that is effacing, a help in opening up the mind, and which conduces to complete turning away, dispassion, cessation, peace, direct knowledge, enlightenment, and Nibbana -- that is, talk about fewness of wishes, talk about contentment, talk about seclusion, talk about being non-gregarious, talk about putting forth energy, talk about virtue, talk about concentration, talk about wisdom, talk about deliverance, talk about the knowledge and vision of deliverance. When mind-
deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, this is the third thing that leads to its maturity.

"Furthermore, Meghiya, a bhikkhu lives with energy instigated for the abandoning of unwholesome states and the acquiring of wholesome states; he is vigorous, energetic, and persevering with regard to wholesome states. When mind-deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, this is the fourth thing that leads to its maturity.

"Furthermore, Meghiya, a bhikkhu is wise, endowed with the noble ones' penetrative understanding of rise and disappearance leading to the complete ending of suffering. When mind-deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, this is the fifth thing that leads to its maturity. When mind-deliverance is as yet immature, Meghiya, these five things lead to its maturity.

"It is to be expected of a bhikkhu who has good friends, good associates, good companions, that he will be virtuous, that he will live restrained by the restraint of the Patimokkha, endowed with conduct and resort, and that seeing danger in the smallest faults, he will train in the training rules he has accepted. It is to be expected of a bhikkhu who has good friends ... that he will obtain at will, with no trouble or difficulty, talk that is effacing, a help in opening up the mind ... talk about the knowledge and vision of deliverance. It is to be expected of a bhikkhu who has good friends ... that he will live with energy instigated ... vigorous, energetic, and persevering with regard to wholesome states. It is to be expected of a bhikkhu who has good friends ... that he will be wise, endowed with the noble ones' penetrative understanding of rise and disappearance leading to the complete ending of suffering.

"A bhikkhu, Meghiya, who is established in these five things should also cultivate four additional things: foulness should be cultivated for overcoming lust; lovingkindness should be cultivated for overcoming malevolence; respiration-mindfulness should be cultivated for cutting off (discursive) thinking; the perception of impermanence should be cultivated for the removal of the conceit 'I am.' For when one perceives impermanence, Meghiya, the perception of not-self is established. When one perceives not-self one reaches the removal of the conceit 'I am,' which is called Nibbana here and now."

Then, on realizing its significance, the Lord uttered on that occasion this inspired utterance:

Trivial thoughts, subtle thoughts,
Mental jerkings that follow one along:
Not understanding these mental thoughts,
One runs back and forth with wandering mind.

But having known these mental thoughts,
The ardent and mindful one restrains them.
An awakened one has entirely abandoned them,
These mental jerkings that follow one along.

---o0o---

Udana IV.3

Gopala Sutta

The Cowherd

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was wandering among the Kosalans with a large community of monks. Then he came down from the road, went to a certain tree, and on arrival sat down on a seat made ready. A certain cowherd then went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, the Blessed One, instructed, urged, roused, & encouraged him with a talk on Dhamma. The cowherd -- instructed, urged, roused, & encouraged by the Blessed One's talk on Dhamma -- said to him: "Lord, may the Blessed One, together with the community of monks, acquiesce to my offer of tomorrow's meal."

The Blessed One acquiesced with silence.

Then the cowherd, understanding the Blessed One's acquiescence, got up from his seat, bowed down to the Blessed One, circumambulated him, and left.

Then, after the night had passed, the cowherd -- having prepared in his own home a great deal of thick milk-rice porridge & fresh ghee -- announced the time of the meal to the Blessed One: "It is time, lord. The meal is ready."

So the Blessed One early in the morning put on his robes and, carrying his bowl and outer robe, went together with the community of monks to the cowherd's home. On arrival, he sat down on a seat made ready. The cowherd, with his own hand, served & satisfied the community of monks headed by the Blessed One with thick milk-rice porridge & fresh ghee. Then, when the Blessed One had eaten and had removed his hand from his bowl, the cowherd took a lower seat and sat down to one side. As he was sitting there, the Blessed One, instructed, urged, roused, & encouraged him with a talk on Dhamma, then got up from his seat & left.

Now, not long after the Blessed One's departure, the cowherd was killed by a certain man between the boundaries of two villages. A large number of monks then went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As they were sitting there, they told him: "The cowherd who today served & satisfied the community of monks headed by the Blessed One with thick milk-rice porridge & fresh ghee, has been killed, it is said, by a certain man between the boundaries of two villages."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Whatever an enemy
might do to an enemy,
or a foe
to a foe,
the ill-directed mind
can do to you
even worse.

---o0o---

Udana IV.4

Juñha Sutta

Moonlit

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Rajagaha at the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrels' Sanctuary. Now at that time Ven. Sariputta andVen. Maha Moggallana were staying in Pigeon Cave. Then, on a moonlit night, Ven. Sariputta -- his head newly shaven -- was sitting in the open air, having attained a certain level of concentration.

It so happened that two yakkhas who were companions were flying from north to south on some business or other. They saw Ven. Sariputta -- his head newly shaven -- sitting in the open air. Seeing him, the first yakkha said to the second, "I'm inspired to give this contemplative a blow on the head."

When this was said, the second yakkha said to the first, "Enough of that, my good friend. Don't lay a hand on the contemplative. He's an outstanding contemplative, of great power and great might."

A second time, the first yakkha said to the second, "I'm inspired to give this contemplative a blow on the head."

A second time, the second yakkha said to the first, "Enough of that, my good friend. Don't lay a hand on the contemplative. He's an outstanding contemplative, of great power and great might."

A third time, the first yakkha said to the second, "I'm inspired to give this contemplative a blow on the head."

A third time, the second yakkha said to the first, "Enough of that, my good friend. Don't lay a hand on the contemplative. He's an outstanding contemplative, of great power and great might."

Then the first yakkha, ignoring the second yakkha, gave Ven. Sariputta a blow on the head. And with that blow he might have knocked over an elephant seven or eight cubits tall, or split a rocky crag. But right there the yakkha -- yelling, "I'm burning!" -- fell into the Great Hell.

Now, Ven. Moggallana -- with his divine eye, pure and surpassing the human -- saw the yakkha give Ven. Sariputta a blow on the head. Seeing this, he went to Ven. Sariputta and, on arrival, said to him, "I hope you are well, friend Sariputta. I hope you are comfortable. I hope you are feeling no pain."

"I am well, friend Moggallana. I am comfortable. But I do have a slight headache."

"How amazing, friend Sariputta! How awesome! How great your power and might! Just now a yakkha gave you a blow on the head. So great was that blow that he might have knocked over an elephant seven or eight cubits tall, or split a rocky crag. But all you say is this: 'I am well, friend Moggallana. I am comfortable. But I do have a slight headache'!"

"How amazing, friend Moggallana! How awesome! How great your power and might! Where you saw a yakkha just now, I didn't even see a dust devil!"

The Blessed One -- with his divine ear, pure and surpassing the human -- heard those two great beings speak in praise of one another in this way. Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Whose mind is like rock,
steady,
unmoved,
dispassionate for things that spark passion,
unangered by things that spark anger:
When one's mind is developed like this,
from where can there come
suffering & stress?

---o0o---

Udana IV.5

Naga Sutta

The Bull Elephant

Translated from the Pali by John D. Ireland.

Thus have I heard. At one time the Lord was staying near Kosambi at the Ghosita monastery. At that time the Lord was living hemmed in by bhikkhus and bhikkhunis, by male and female lay followers, by kings and royal ministers, by sectarian teachers and their disciples, and he lived in discomfort and not at ease. Then the Lord thought: "At present I am living hemmed in by bhikkhus and bhikkhunis ... by sectarian teachers and their disciples, and I live in discomfort and not at ease. Suppose I were to live alone, secluded from the crowd?"

Then the Lord, having put on his robe in the forenoon and taken his bowl and outer cloak, entered Kosambi for almsfood. Having walked for almsfood in Kosambi and returned after the meal, he set his lodging in order by himself, took his bowl and cloak, and without informing his attendant or taking leave of the Order of bhikkhus, he set off alone, without a companion, for Parileyyaka. Walking on tour by stages, he arrived at Parileyyaka and stayed near Parileyyaka in a protected forest at the foot of an auspicious sal-tree.

Now a certain bull elephant was living hemmed in by elephants and she-elephants, by elephant calves and sucklings; he ate grass with the tips pulled off and they ate the branches he had broken down. He drank muddied water and on going down and coming out of the water he was jostled by she-elephants; and he lived in discomfort and not at ease. Then that bull elephant thought: "At present I am living hemmed in by elephants and she-elephants, by elephant calves and sucklings; I eat grass with the tips pulled off and they eat the branches which I break down. I drink muddied water and on going down and coming out of the water I am jostled by she-elephants; and I live in discomfort and not at ease. Suppose I were to live alone, secluded from the crowd?"

So that bull elephant left the herd and went to Parileyyaka, to the protected forest, and approached the Lord at the foot of the auspicious sal-tree. On reaching the place where the Lord was staying that bull elephant kept the place free of grass and brought water with his trunk for the Lord's use.

Then, while the Lord was in solitude and seclusion, this thought arose in his mind: "Formerly I was living hemmed in by bhikkhus and bhikkhunis ... and I was living in discomfort and not at ease. But now I live not hemmed in by bhikkhus and bhikkhunis ... in comfort and at ease." And also this thought arose in that bull elephant's mind: "Formerly I was living hemmed in by elephants and she-elephants ... and I was living in discomfort and not at ease, but now I live not hemmed in by elephants and she-elephants ... I eat unbroken grass and (others) do not eat the branches which I break down. I drink clear water and on going down and coming out of the water I am not jostled by she-elephants, and I live in comfort and at ease."

Then the Lord, on observing his own solitude, understood with his mind the thought in the mind of that bull elephant, and uttered on that occasion this inspired utterance:

This unites mind with mind,
The perfected one and the bull elephant
With tusks as long as chariot-poles:
That each delights in being alone in the forest.

---o0o---

Udana IV.6

Pindola Sutta

About Pindola

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time Ven. Pindola Bharadvaja was sitting not far from the Blessed One, his legs crossed, his body held erect -- a forest dweller, an alms-goer, a rag-robe wearer, an owner of only one set of three robes, a man of few wishes, content, solitary, unentangled, his persistence aroused, an advocate of the ascetic practices, devoted to the heightened mind. The Blessed One saw Ven. Pindola Bharadvaja sitting not far away, his legs crossed, his body held erect -- a forest dweller, an alms-goer, a rag-robe wearer, an owner of only one set of three robes, a man of few wishes, content, solitary, unentangled, his persistence aroused, an advocate of the ascetic practices, devoted to the heightened mind.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Not reviling, not injuring,
restraint in line with the Patimokkha,
moderation in food,
dwelling in seclusion,
devotion to the heightened mind:
this is the teaching
of the Awakened Ones.

---o0o---

Udana IV.7

Sariputta Sutta

About Sariputta

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time Ven. Sariputta was sitting not far from the Blessed One -- his legs crossed, his body held erect -- a man of few wishes, content, solitary, unentangled, his persistence aroused, devoted to the heightened mind. The Blessed One saw Ven. Sariputta sitting not far away -- his legs crossed, his body held erect -- a man of few wishes, content, solitary, unentangled, his persistence aroused, devoted to the heightened mind.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Exalted in mind & heedful,
the sage trained in sagacity's ways:
He has no sorrows, one who is Such,
calmed & ever mindful.

---o0o---

Udana IV.9

Upasena Vangataputta Sutta

About Upasena Vangataputta

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Rajagaha at the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrels' Sanctuary. Now at that time, when Ven. Upasena Vangantaputta was alone in seclusion, this line of thinking arose in his awareness: "What a gain, what a true gain it is for me that my teacher is the Blessed One, worthy and a fully self-awakened; that I have gone forth from home to the homeless life in a well-taught Dhamma and discipline; that my companions in the holy life are virtuous and endowed with admirable qualities; that I have achieved culmination in terms of the precepts; that my mind is unified and well-concentrated; that I am an arahant, with effluents ended; that I have great power and great might. Fortunate has been my life; fortunate will be my death."

Then the Blessed One, comprehending with his awareness the line of thinking that had arisen in Ven. Upasena Vangantaputta's awareness, on that occasion exclaimed:

He feels no regret at what life has been,
he feels no sorrow at death,
if -- a wise one -- he has seen that state.
He feels no sorrow
in the midst of sorrow.

For one who has destroyed
craving for becoming --
the monk of peaceful mind --
birth & the wandering on
are totally ended.
There is no further becoming.

---o0o---

Udana IV.10

Sariputta Sutta

About Sariputta (2)

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time Ven. Sariputta was sitting not far from the Blessed One -- his legs crossed, his body held erect -- reflecting on the peace within himself. The Blessed One saw Ven. Sariputta sitting not far away -- his legs crossed, his body held erect -- reflecting on the peace within himself

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

For the monk whose mind is
peaceful, at peace,
whose cord to becoming is cut,
birth & the wandering on
are totally ended.
Freed is he
from Mara's bonds

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29/05/201703:32(Xem: 587)
Dhamma is a teaching. Pada is a verse. Dhammapada is a basic scripture in Buddhism, has 423 verses in 26 chapters. Each verse has a meaning that shows a noble way of living. In India, there was the Rigveda as the ancient scriptures of the Hindu. Likewise, Dhammapada was also considered as a sacred ancient Buddhist scripture which nurtures the noble thought for Buddhist followers, monks, or nuns. The content of the Dhammapada (based on the translated text by venerable Thích Minh Châu) is as follows:
27/03/201706:57(Xem: 4449)
The Seeker's Glossary of Buddhism By Sutra Translation Committee of USA/Canada This is a revised and expanded edition of The Seeker's Glossary of Buddhism. The text is a compendium of excerpts and quotations from some 350 works by monks, nuns, professors, scholars and other laypersons from nine different countries, in their own words or in translation. The editors have merely organized the material, adding a few connecting thoughts of their own for ease in reading.
04/06/201606:17(Xem: 852)
Thus have I heard, at one time the Buddha was staying at Isipatana, near Varanasi. At that time, the Blessed One expounded the supreme knowledge he had realised to the group of five ascetics. "There are two extremes that one who has gone forth from worldly life should not practise. Which two? 1) That which is devoted to sensual pleasure with reference to sense objects, which is lowly, common, vulgar, unworthy and unprofitable; and 2) That which is devoted to self-affliction, which is painful, unworthy and unprofitable. Avoiding both of these extremes, the Middle Path realised by the Tathagata produces vision and knowledge, and leads to tranquility, to direct insight, to the extinction of defilements, to enlightenment, to Nibbana."
04/11/201401:50(Xem: 4007)
The Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara, from the deep course of Prajna wisdom, saw clearly that all five skandhas were empty, thus sundered all bonds of suffering. Sariputra, know then: form does not differ from emptiness, nor does emptiness differ from form. Form is no other than emptiness, emptiness no other than form. The same is true of feelings, perceptions, impulses and consciousness.
20/03/201413:03(Xem: 1260)
The Pali Canon is a vast body of literature: in English translation the texts add up to several thousand printed pages. Most (but not all) of the Canon has already been published in English over the years. Although only a small fraction of these texts are available on this website, this collection can be a good place to start.
05/04/201111:51(Xem: 952)
The Five Mindfulness Trainings are one of the most concrete ways to practice mindfulness. They are nonsectarian, and their nature is universal. They are true practices of compassion and understanding. All spiritual traditions have their equivalent to the Five Mindfulness Trainings. The first training is to protect life, to decrease violence in onc-self, in the family and in society. The second training is to practice social justice, generosity, not stealing and not exploiting other living beings. The third is the practice of responsible sexual behavior in order to protect individuals, couples, families and children. The fourth is the practice of deep listening and loving speech to restore communication and reconcile. The fifth is about mindful consumption, to help us not bring toxins and poisons into our body or mind.
19/10/201016:05(Xem: 331)
The Tipitaka (Pali ti, "three," + pitaka, "baskets"), or Pali Canon, is the collection of primary Pali language texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism. Together with the ancient commentaries, they constitute the complete body of classical Theravada texts. The Pali Canon is a vast body of literature: in English translation the texts add up to several thousand printed pages. Most (but not all) of the Canon has already been published in English over the years. Although only a small fraction of these texts are available on this website, this collection can be a good place to start.