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Udana

20/03/201413:56(Xem: 3114)
Udana

Khuddaka Nikaya
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Udana

Exclamations

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Selected suttas from the Udana

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Contents

1

I. Bodhivagga -- The Chapter About Awakening

2

II. Muccalindavagga -- The Chapter About Muccalinda

3

III. Nandavagga -- The Chapter About Nanda

4

IV. Meghiyavagga -- The Chapter About Meghiya

5

V. Sonavagga -- The Chapter About Sona

6

VI. Jaccandhavagga -- Blind from Birth

7

VII. Culavagga -- The Minor Chapter

8

VIII. Pataligamiyavagga -- The Chapter About Patali Village

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I. Bodhivagga -- The Chapter About Awakening(^)

  • Bodhi Sutta (Ud I.1) -- Awakening (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    Bodhi Sutta (Ud I.2) -- Awakening (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    Bodhi Sutta (Ud I.3) -- Awakening (3) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    The Buddha contemplates dependent origination shortly after his Awakening.
  • Kassapa Sutta (Ud I.6) -- About Maha Kassapa [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Ven. Maha Kassapa chooses to go on his alsmround among the poor and indigent, rather than among the devas.
  • Bahiya Sutta (Ud I.10) -- About Bahiya [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. The ascetic Bahiya meets the Buddha, receives a brief teaching from him, and becomes an arahant.

II. Muccalindavagga -- The Chapter About Muccalinda(^)

  • Muccalinda Sutta (Ud II.1) -- About Muccalinda/Mucalinda [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. Muccalinda, king of the protective nagas,visits the Buddha.
  • Raja Sutta (Ud II.2) -- Kings [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha scolds a group of monks for chattering about politics.
  • Danda Sutta (Ud II.3) -- The Stick [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha sees a group of boys beating a snake with a stick.
  • Sakkara Sutta (Ud II.4) -- Veneration [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Ascetics from other sects become jealous of the support and respect offered to the Buddha.
  • Upasaka Sutta (Ud II.5) -- The Lay Follower [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. A busy layperson finally pays a visit to the Buddha.
  • Gabbhini Sutta (Ud II.6) -- The Pregnant Woman [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. A man becomes terribly ill after drinking oil to bring to his pregnant wife.
  • Ekaputta Sutta (Ud II.7) -- The Only Son [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The grieving friends and family of a lay-follower's deceased son pay a visit to the Buddha.
  • Visakha Sutta (Ud II.9) -- To Visakha [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Visakha the laywoman pays a visit to the Buddha.
  • Bhaddiya Kaligodha Sutta (Ud II.10) -- About Bhaddiya Kaligodha [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. A meditating monk proclaims the blissfulness of life as a forest recluse.

III. Nandavagga -- The Chapter About Nanda(^)

  • Kamma Sutta (Ud III.1) -- Action [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. A meditating monk endures the aches and pains of illness.
  • Nanda Sutta (Ud III.2) -- About Nanda [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. The Buddha ingeniously dissuades Ven. Nanda, his half-brother, from disrobing.
  • Yasoja Sutta (Ud III.3) -- About Yasoja [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. A group of monks, suitably chastened by the Buddha for their raucous behavior, become arahants.
  • Sariputta Sutta (Ud III.4) -- About Sariputta [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Sariputta seated in meditation.
  • Kolita Sutta (Ud III.5) -- About Kolita (Maha Moggallana) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Maha Moggallana seated in meditation.
  • Loka Sutta (Ud III.10) -- (Surveying) the World [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Following his Awakening, the Buddha surveys the world with his mind's eye and sees a world full of ignorance, craving, and suffering.

IV. Meghiyavagga -- The Chapter About Meghiya(^)

  • Meghiya Sutta (Ud IV.1) -- About Meghiya [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. An over-eager monk is assailed by unskillful states of mind, and the Buddha reminds him of the importance of associating with admirable friends.
  • Gopala Sutta (Ud IV.3) -- The Cowherd [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. A cowherd invites the monks to a meal at his home.
  • Juñha Sutta (Ud IV.4) -- Moonlit [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. A cantankerous yakkhadecides to hit Ven. Sariputta over the head, and pays the price for his stupidity.
  • Naga Sutta (Ud IV.5) -- The Bull Elephant [John D. Ireland, trans.]. The Buddha moves from a noisy, crowded part of the forest to a more secluded one.
  • Pindola Sutta (Ud IV.6) -- About Pindola [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Pindola seated in meditation.
  • Sariputta Sutta (Ud IV.7) -- About Sariputta (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Sariputta seated in meditation.
  • Upasena Vangataputta Sutta (Ud IV.9) -- About Upasena Vangantaputta [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the attainments of Ven. Upasena Vangataputta.
  • Sariputta Sutta (Ud IV.10) -- About Sariputta (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Sariputta seated in meditation.

V. Sonavagga -- The Chapter About Sona(^)

  • Raja Sutta (Ud V.1) -- The King [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Queen Mallika and King Pasenadi inquire of each other, "Is there anyone more dear to you than yourself?"
  • Kutthi Sutta (Ud V.3) -- The Leper [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha instructs a leper, who soon attains stream-entry.
  • Kumaraka Sutta (Ud V.4) -- The Boys [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha comes upon two boys catching fish, and speaks to them about physical pain.
  • Uposatha Sutta (Ud V.5) -- The Observance [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. The Buddha compares the wonderful qualities of the Dhamma to the qualities of the ocean.
  • Sona Sutta (Ud V.6) -- About Sona [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. A devoted lay follower recognizes the drawbacks of the householder's life and decides to become a monk.
  • Revata Sutta (Ud V.7) -- About Revata [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Revata seated in meditation.
  • Saddayamana Sutta (Ud V.9) -- Uproar [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by a nearby group of boisterous youths.
  • Panthaka Sutta (Ud V.10) -- About Cula Panthaka [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Cula Panthaka seated in meditation.

VI. Jaccandhavagga -- Blind from Birth(^)

  • Jatila Sutta (Ud VI.2) -- Ascetics [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha explains to King Pasenadi how another's virtue, purity, endurance, and discernment may be known.
  • Ahu Sutta (Ud VI.3) -- It Was [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha reflects on the unskillful qualities he has abandoned and the skillful ones he has perfected.
  • Tittha Sutta (Ud VI.4) -- Various Sectarians (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. The Buddha uses the famous simile of the blind men and the elephant to illustrate the futility of arguing about one's views and opinions.
  • Tittha Sutta (Ud VI.5) -- Various Sectarians (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]
    Tittha Sutta (Ud VI.6) -- Various Sectarians (3) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]
    The Buddha overhears some heated arguments between various speculative philosophers.
  • Subhuti Sutta (Ud VI.7) -- About Subhuti [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha praises a monk for practicing jhana.
  • Ganika Sutta (Ud VI.8) -- The Courtesan [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by reports of deadly battles over the affections of a certain courtesan.
  • Adhipataka Sutta (Ud VI.9) -- Insects [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of insects circling into a flame.

VII. Culavagga -- The Minor Chapter(^)

  • Bhaddiya Sutta (Ud VII.1) -- About Bhaddiya the Dwarf (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Ven. Sariputta helps guide Ven. Bhaddiya to the brink of arahantship.
  • Bhaddiya Sutta (Ud VII.2) -- About Bhaddiya the Dwarf (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Ven Sariputta, failing to see that Ven. Bhaddiya is now an arahant, continues instructing him.
  • Kamesu Satta Sutta (Ud VII.3) -- Attached to Sensual Pleasures (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.].
  • Kamesu Satta Sutta (Ud VII.4) -- Attached to Sensual Pleasures (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. Two occasions in which the Buddha is inspired by the sight of laypeople and their addictions to sensual pleasures.
  • Tanhakhaya Sutta (Ud VII.6) -- The Ending of Craving [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The Buddha is inspired by the sight of Ven. Añña Kondañña seated in meditation.
  • Udapana Sutta (Ud VII.9) -- The Well [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]. In a rare display of his supernatural powers, the Buddha makes a point of Dhamma to Ven. Ananda.
  • Udena Sutta (Ud VII.10) -- About King Udena [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. 500 women, all of whom had attained at least stream-entry, perish in a fire.

VIII. Pataligamiyavagga -- The Chapter About Patali Village(^)

  • Nibbana Sutta (Ud VIII.1) -- Total Unbinding/Parinibbana (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    Nibbana Sutta (Ud VIII.2) -- Total Unbinding/Parinibbana (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    Nibbana Sutta (Ud VIII.3) -- Total Unbinding/Parinibbana (3) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    Nibbana Sutta (Ud VIII.4) -- Total Unbinding/Parinibbana (4) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans. | John D. Ireland, trans.]
    Four suttas in which the Buddha describes the nature of Nibbana.
  • Visakha Sutta (Ud VIII.8) -- To Visakha [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]. The laywoman Visakha, grieving over the death of a grandchild, receives a powerful teaching concerning clinging and death.
  • Dabba Sutta (Ud VIII.9) -- About Dabba Mallaputta (1) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]
    Dabba Sutta (Ud VIII.10) -- About Dabba Mallaputta (2) [Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.]
    The Buddha is inspired by Ven. Dabba Mallaputta's spectacular death and attainment of Parinibbana.

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