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Raja Sutta

20/03/201415:37(Xem: 2598)
Raja Sutta

Khuddaka Nikaya
---o0o---

Udana

Exclamations

---o0o---

Udana V.1

Raja Sutta

The King

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time King Pasenadi Kosalawas together with Queen Mallika in the upper palace. Then he said to her, "Is there anyone more dear to you than yourself?"

"No, your majesty," she answered. "There is no one more dear to me than myself. And what about you, your majesty? Is there anyone more dear to you than yourself?"

"No, Mallika. There is no one more dear to me than myself."

Then the king, descending from the palace, went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to the Blessed One: "Just now I was together with Queen Mallika in the upper palace. I said to her, 'Is there anyone more dear to you than yourself?'

"'No, your majesty,' she answered. 'There is no one more dear to me than myself. And what about you, your majesty? Is there anyone more dear to you than yourself?'

"'No, Mallika. There is no one more dear to me than myself.'"

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Searching all directions
with one's awareness,
one finds no one dearer
than oneself.
In the same way, others
are fiercely dear to themselves.
So one should not hurt others
if one loves oneself.

---o0o---

Udana V.3

Kutthi Sutta

The Leper

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Rajagaha at the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrels' Sanctuary. Now at that time in Rajagaha there was a leper named Suppabuddha, a poor, miserable wretch of a person. And at that time the Blessed One was sitting surrounded by a large assembly, teaching the Dhamma. Suppabuddha the leper saw the large gathering of people from afar and thought to himself, "Without a doubt, someone must be distributing staple or non-staple food over there. Why don't I go over to that large group of people, and maybe I'll get some staple or non-staple food." So he went over to the large group of people. Then he saw the Blessed One sitting surrounded by a large assembly, teaching the Dhamma. On seeing this, he realized, "There's no one distributing staple or non-staple food over here. That's Gotama the contemplative, sitting surrounded by a large assembly, teaching the Dhamma. Why don't I listen to the Dhamma?" So he sat down to one side right there, [thinking,] "I, too, will listen to the Dhamma."

Then the Blessed One, having encompassed the awareness of the entire assembly with his awareness, asked himself, "Now who here is capable of understanding the Dhamma?" He saw Suppabuddha the leper sitting in the assembly, and on seeing him the thought occurred to him, "This person here is capable of understanding the Dhamma." So, aiming at Suppabuddha the leper, he gave a step-by-step talk, i.e., a talk on generosity, on virtue, on heaven; he declared the drawbacks, degradation, & corruption of sensual passions, and the rewards of renunciation. Then when he saw that Suppabuddha the leper's mind was ready, malleable, free from hindrances, elated, & bright, he then gave the Dhamma-talk peculiar to Awakened Ones, i.e., stress, origination, cessation, & path. And just as a clean cloth, free of stains, would properly absorb a dye, in the same way, as Suppabuddha the leper was sitting in that very seat, the dustless, stainless Dhamma eye arose within him, "Whatever is subject to origination is all subject to cessation."

Having seen the Dhamma, reached the Dhamma, known the Dhamma, having plunged entirely into the Dhamma, having crossed over & beyond doubt, having had no more perplexity, having gained fearlessness & independence from others with regard to the Teacher's message, he rose up from his seat and went to the Blessed One. On arrival, having bowed down to the Blessed One, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: "Magnificent, venerable sir! Magnificent! Just as if the Blessed One were to place upright what was overturned, to reveal what was hidden, to show the way to one who was lost, or were to carry a lamp into the dark so that those with eyes could see forms, in the same way has the Blessed One -- through many lines of reasoning -- made the Dhamma clear. I go to the Blessed One for refuge, to the Dhamma, and to the Community of monks. May the Blessed One remember me as a lay follower who has gone to him for refuge, from this day forward, for life."

Then Suppabuddha the leper, having been instructed, urged, roused, & encouraged by the Blessed One's Dhamma talk, delighting & approving of the Blessed One's words, got up from his seat, bowed down to the Blessed One, circumambulated him -- keeping him to his right -- and left. Not long after his departure he was attacked & killed by a cow with a young calf.

Then a large number of monks approached the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As they were sitting there, they said to the Blessed One, "Lord, the leper named Suppabuddha, whom the Blessed One instructed, urged, roused, & encouraged with a Dhamma talk, has died. What is his destination? What is his future state?"

"Monks, Suppabuddha the leper was wise. He practiced the Dhamma in accordance with the Dhamma and did not pester me with issues related to the Dhamma. With the destruction of the first three fetters, he is a stream-winner, not subject to states of deprivation, headed for self-awakening for sure."

When this was said, one of the monks said to the Blessed One, "Lord, what was the cause, what was the reason, why Suppabuddha the leper was such a poor, miserable wretch of a person?"

"Once, monks, in this very Rajagaha, Suppabuddha the leper was the son of a rich money-lender. While being escorted to a pleasure park, he saw Tagarasikhi the Private Buddha going for alms in the city. On seeing him, he thought, 'Who is this leper prowling about?' Spitting and disrespectfully turning his left side to Tagarasikhi the Private Buddha, he left. As a result of that deed he boiled in hell for many years, many hundreds of years, many thousands of years, many hundreds of thousands of years. And then as a result of that deed he became a poor, miserable wretch of a person in this very Rajagaha. But on encountering the Dhamma & Discipline made known by the Tathagata, he acquired conviction, virtue, learning, relinquishment, & discernment. Having acquired conviction, virtue, learning, relinquishment, & discernment on encountering the Dhamma & Discipline made known by the Tathagata, now -- on the break-up of the body, after death -- he has reappeared in a good destination, the heavenly world, in company with the devas of the heaven of the Thirty-three. There he outshines the other devas both in beauty & in glory."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

A person with good eyes,
encountering
a treacherous, uneven place,
would try hard to avoid it.
A wise person, in the world of life,
should avoid
evil deeds.

---o0o---

Udana V.4

Kumaraka Sutta

The Boys

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time, a large number of boys on the road between Savatthi and Jeta's Grove were catching fish. Then early in the morning the Blessed One, having put on his robes and carrying his bowl and outer robe, went into Savatthi for alms. He saw the large number of boys on the road between Savatthi and Jeta's Grove catching fish. Seeing them, he went up to them and, on arrival, said to them: "Boys, do you fear pain? Do you dislike pain?"

"Yes, lord, we fear pain. We dislike pain."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

If you fear pain,
if you dislike pain,
don't do an evil deed
in open or secret.
If you're doing or will do
an evil deed,
you won't escape pain:
it will catch you
even as you run away.

---o0o---

Udana V.5

Uposatha Sutta

The Observance

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Savatthi at the Eastern Monastery, the palace of Migara's mother. Now at that time, the Blessed One -- it being the observance day -- was sitting surrounded by the community of monks. Then Ven. Ananda -- when the night was far advanced, at the end of the first watch -- arose from his seat, arranged his robe over one shoulder, stood facing the Blessed One with his hands placed palm-to-palm over his heart, and said to him: "The night, venerable sir, is far advanced. The first watch has ended. The community of monks has been sitting here long. Let the Blessed One recite the Patimokkha to them." When this was said, the Blessed One remained silent.

Then a second time, when the night was far advanced, at the end of the second watch, Ven. Ananda arose from his seat, arranged his robe over one shoulder, stood facing the Blessed One with his hands placed palm-to-palm over his heart, and said to him: "The night, venerable sir, is far advanced. The second watch has ended. The community of monks has been sitting here long. Let the Blessed One recite the Patimokkha to them." When this was said, the Blessed One remained silent.

Then a third time, when the night was far advanced, at the end of the third watch, as dawn was approaching and the face of the night was beaming, Ven. Ananda arose from his seat, arranged his robe over one shoulder, stood facing the Blessed One with his hands placed palm-to-palm over his heart, and said to him: "The night, venerable sir, is far advanced. The third watch has ended. Dawn is approaching and the face of the night is beaming. The community of monks has been sitting here long. Let the Blessed One recite the Patimokkha to the community of monks."

"Ananda, the gathering isn't pure."

Then the thought occurred to Ven. Maha Moggallana: "In reference to which individual did the Blessed One just now say, 'Ananda, the gathering isn't pure'?" So he directed his mind, encompassing with his awareness the awareness of the entire community of monks. He saw that individual -- unprincipled, evil, unclean and suspect in his undertakings, hidden in his actions, not a contemplative though claiming to be one, not leading the holy life though claiming to do so, inwardly rotten, oozing with desire, filthy by nature -- sitting in the midst of the community of monks. On seeing him, he got up, went over to that individual, and on reaching him said, "Get up, my friend. You have been seen by the Blessed One. You have no communion with the community of monks." Then the individual remained silent. A second time...A third time, Ven. Maha Moggallana said, "Get up, my friend. You have been seen by the Blessed One. You have no communion with the community of monks." And for a third time the individual remained silent.

Then Ven. Maha Moggallana, grabbing that individual by the arm, having expelled him through the outside door of the porch and locking the bolt, approached the Blessed One and on arrival said, "I have expelled that individual, venerable sir. The gathering is now pure. Let the Blessed One recite the Patimokkha to the community of monks."

"Isn't it amazing, Moggallana. Isn't it astounding, how that individual waited until he was grabbed by the arm." Then the Blessed One addressed the monks: "From now on I will no longer perform the observance or recite the Patimokkha. You alone, monks, will perform the observance and recite the Patimokkha. It is impossible, it cannot happen, that a Tathagata would perform the observance or recite the Patimokkha with an impure gathering.

"Monks, there are these eight amazing and astounding facts about the ocean that, as they see them again and again, have the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean. Which eight?

"[1] The ocean has a gradual shelf, a gradual slope, a gradual inclination, with a sudden drop-off only after a long stretch. The fact that the ocean has a gradual shelf, a gradual slope, a gradual inclination, with a sudden drop-off only after a long stretch: This is the first amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"[2] And furthermore, the ocean is stable and does not overstep its tideline...This is the second amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras pleased with the ocean.

"[3] And furthermore, the ocean does not tolerate a dead body. Any dead body in the ocean gets washed to the shore and thrown up on dry land...This is the third amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"[4] And furthermore, whatever great rivers there are -- such as the Ganges, the Yamuna, the Aciravati, the Sarabhu, the Mahi -- on reaching the ocean, give up their former names and are classed simply as "ocean"...This is the fourth amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"[5] And furthermore, though the rivers of the world pour into the ocean, and rain falls from the sky, no swelling or diminishing in the ocean for that reason can be discerned...This is the fifth amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"[6] And furthermore, the ocean has a single taste: that of salt...This is the sixth amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"[7] And furthermore, the ocean has these many treasures of various kinds: pearls, sapphires, lapis lazuli, shells, quartz, coral, silver, gold, rubies, and cat's eyes...This is the seventh amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"[8] And furthermore, the ocean is the abode of such mighty beings as whales, whale-eaters, and whale-eater-eaters; asuras, nagas, and gandhabbas. There are in the ocean beings one hundred leagues long, two hundred...three hundred...four hundred...five hundred leagues long. The fact that the ocean is the abode of such mighty beings as whales, whale-eaters, and whale-eater-eaters; asuras, nagas, and gandhabbas; and there are in the ocean beings one hundred leagues long, two hundred...three hundred...four hundred...five hundred leagues long: This is the eighth amazing and astounding fact about the ocean that, as they see it again and again, has the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"These are the eight amazing and astounding facts about the ocean that, as they see them again and again, have the Asuras greatly pleased with the ocean.

"In the same way, monks, there are eight amazing and astounding facts about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see them again and again, have the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline. Which eight?

"[1] Just as the ocean has a gradual shelf, a gradual slope, a gradual inclination, with a sudden drop-off only after a long stretch, in the same way this Doctrine and Discipline has a gradual training, a gradual performance, a gradual progression, with a penetration to gnosis only after a long stretch. The fact that this Doctrine and Discipline has a gradual training, a gradual performance, a gradual progression, with a penetration to gnosis only after a long stretch: This is the first amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[2] And furthermore, just as the ocean is stable and does not overstep its tideline, in the same way my disciples do not -- even for the sake of their lives -- overstep the training rules I have formulated for them...This is the second amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[3] And furthermore, just as the ocean does not tolerate a dead body -- any dead body in the ocean getting washed to the shore and thrown up on dry land -- in the same way, if an individual is unprincipled, evil, unclean and suspect in his undertakings, hidden in his actions -- not a contemplative though claiming to be one, not leading the holy life though claiming to do so, inwardly rotten, oozing with desire, filthy by nature -- the community has no communion with him. Holding an immediate meeting, they banish him from the community. Even though he may be sitting in the midst of the community, he is far from the community, and the community far from him...This is the third amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[4] And furthermore, just as whatever great rivers there are -- such as the Ganges, the Yamuna, the Aciravati, the Sarabhu, the Mahi -- on reaching the ocean, give up their former names and are classed simply as "ocean"; in the same way, when members of the four castes -- noble warriors, priests, merchants, and workers -- go forth from home to the homeless life in the Doctrine and Discipline declared by the Tathagata, they give up their former names and clans and are classed simply as "contemplatives, sons of the Sakyan"...This is the fourth amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[5] And furthermore, just as the rivers of the world pour into the ocean, and rain falls from the sky, but no swelling or diminishing in the ocean for that reason can be discerned; in the same way, although many monks are totally unbound into the property of Unbinding with no fuel remaining, no swelling or diminishing in the property of Unbinding for that reason can be discerned...This is the fifth amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[6] And furthermore, just as the ocean has a single taste -- that of salt -- in the same way, this Doctrine and Discipline has a single taste: that of release...This is the sixth amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[7] And furthermore, just as the ocean has these many treasures of various kinds -- pearls, sapphires, lapis lazuli, shells, quartz, coral, silver, gold, rubies, and cat's eyes -- in the same way, this Doctrine and Discipline has these many treasures of various kinds: the four frames of reference, the four right exertions, the four bases of power, the five faculties, the five strengths, the seven factors of Awakening, the noble eightfold path...This is the seventh amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"[8] And furthermore, just as the ocean is the abode of such mighty beings as whales, whale-eaters, and whale-eater-eaters; asuras, nagas, and gandhabbas, and there are in the ocean beings one hundred leagues long, two hundred...three hundred...four hundred...five hundred leagues long; in the same way, this Doctrine and Discipline is the abode of such mighty beings as stream-winners and those practicing to realize the fruit of stream-entry; once-returners and those practicing to realize the fruit of once-returning; non-returners and those practicing to realize the fruit of non-returning; Arahants and those practicing for Arahantship. The fact that this Doctrine and Discipline is the abode of such mighty beings as stream-winners and those practicing to realize the fruit of stream-entry; once-returners and those practicing to realize the fruit of once-returning; non-returners and those practicing to realize the fruit of non-returning; Arahants and those practicing for Arahantship: This is the eighth amazing and astounding fact about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see it again and again, has the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline.

"These are the eight amazing and astounding facts about this Doctrine and Discipline that, as they see them again and again, have the monks greatly pleased with the Doctrine and Discipline."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

The rain soddens what's covered,
& doesn't sodden what's exposed.
So open up what's covered up,
so that it won't get soddened by the rain.

---o0o---

Udana V.5

Uposatha Sutta

The Observance Day

Translated from the Pali by John D. Ireland.

Thus have I heard. At one time the Lord was staying near Savatthi in the Eastern Park at Migara's mother's mansion. On that occasion the Lord was sitting surrounded by the Order of bhikkhus, as it was the day of the Uposatha observance. Then, when the night was far advanced and the first watch had ended, the Venerable Ananda arose from his seat, arranged his robe over one shoulder, raised his folded hands, and said to the Lord: "The night is far advanced, revered sir, the first watch has ended and the bhikkhus have been sitting for a long time. Revered sir, let the Lord recite the Patimokkha to the bhikkhus." When this was said the Lord remained silent.

When the night was (still further) advanced and the middle watch had ended, a second time the Venerable Ananda arose from his seat ... and said to the Lord: "The night is far advanced, revered sir, the middle watch has ended and the bhikkhus have been sitting for a long time. Revered sir, let the Lord recite the Patimokkha to the bhikkhus." A second time the Lord remained silent.

When the night was (yet further) advanced and the last watch had ended, as dawn was approaching and the night was drawing to a close, a third time the Venerable Ananda arose from his seat ... and said to the Lord: "The night is far advanced, revered sir, the last watch has ended; dawn is approaching and the night is drawing to a close and the bhikkhus have been sitting for a long time. Revered sir, let the Lord recite the Patimokka to the bhikkhus."

"The gathering is not pure, Ananda."

Then the Venerable Mahamoggallana thought: "Concerning which person has the Lord said, 'The gathering is not pure, Ananda'?" And the Venerable Mahamoggallana, comprehending the minds of the whole Order of bhikkhus with his own mind, saw that person sitting in the midst of the Order of bhikkhus -- immoral, wicked, of impure and suspect behaviour, secretive in his acts, no recluse though pretending to be one, not practising the holy life though pretending to do so, rotten within, lustful and corrupt. On seeing him he arose from his seat, approached that person, and said: "Get up, friend. You are seen by the Lord. You cannot live in communion with the bhikkhus." But that person remained silent.

A second time and a third time the Venerable Mahamoggallana told that person to get up, and a second time and a third time that person remained silent. Then the Venerable Mahamoggllana took that person by the arm, pulled him outside the gate, and bolted it. Then he approached the Lord and said: "Revered sir, I have ejected that person. The assembly is quite pure. Revered sir, let the Lord recite the Patimokkha to the bhikkhus."

"It is strange, Moggallana, it is remarkable, Moggallana, how that stupid person should have waited until he was taken by the arm."

Then the Lord addressed the bhikkhus: "From now on, bhikkhus, I shall not participate in the Uposatha observance or recite the Patimokkha. From now on you yourselves should participate in the Uposatha observance and recite the Patimokkha. It is impossible, bhikkhus, it cannot happen, that the Tathagata should participate in the Uposatha observance and recite the Patimokkha with a gathering that is not pure.

"Bhikkhus, there are these eight wonderful and marvellous qualities of the great ocean, seeing which the asuras delight in the great ocean. What are the eight?

(1) "The great ocean, bhikkhus, gradually shelves, slopes, and inclines, and there is no sudden precipice. Since the great ocean gradually shelves ... this is the first wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean, seeing which the asuras delight in the great ocean.

(2) "Furthermore, the great ocean is stable and does not exceed the limits of the tide-line. This is the second wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

(3) "Furthermore, the great ocean does not tolerate a dead body; for when there is a dead body in the great ocean, it soon conveys it to the shore and casts it up on dry land. This is the third wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

(4) "Furthermore, whatever great rivers there are -- the Ganges, the Yamuna, the Aciravati, the Sarabhu, and the Mahi -- on reaching the great ocean lose their former names and identities and are just called 'the great ocean.' This is the fourth wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

(5) "Furthermore, although the rivers of the world flow into the great ocean and showers of rain fall from the sky, no lessening or filling up of the great ocean is evident. This is the fifth wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

(6) "Furthermore, the great ocean has one taste, the taste of salt. This is the sixth wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

(7) "Furthermore, the great ocean contains many precious substances, various precious substances, such as these: pearl, crystal, beryl, conch, quartz, coral, silver, gold, ruby, and cat's eye. This is the seventh wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

(8) "Furthermore, the great ocean is the abode of mighty creatures, of such creatures as these: the timi, timingala, timirapingala, asuras, nagas, and gandhabbas.. There exist in the great ocean beings a hundred yojanas in size, beings two hundred, three hundred, four hundred, and five hundred yojanas in size. This is the eighth wonderful and marvellous quality of the great ocean....

"These, bhikkhus, are the eight wonderful and marvellous qualities of the great ocean, seeing which the asuras delight in the great ocean.

"Similarly, bhikkhus, there are eight wonderful and marvellous qualities in this Dhamma and Discipline, seeing which bhikkhus delight in this Dhamma and Discipline. What are the eight?

(1) "Just as the great ocean gradually shelves, slopes, and inclines, and there is no sudden precipice, so also in this Dhamma and Discipline there is a gradual training, a gradual course, a gradual progression, and there is no sudden penetration to final knowledge. Since, in this Dhamma and Discipline there is a gradual training, ... this is the first wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline, seeing which bhikkhus delight in this Dhamma and Discipline.

(2) "Just as the great ocean is stable and does not exceed the limits of the tide-line, so also my disciples do not transgress a training rule laid down by me for disciples even for the sake of their lives. This is the second wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline....

(3) "Just as the great ocean does not tolerate a dead body ... and casts it up on dry land, so also whatsoever person is immoral, wicked, of impure and suspect behaviour, secretive in his acts, no recluse though pretending to be one, not practising the holy life though pretending to do so, rotten within, lustful and corrupt, the Order does not associate with him, but when it has met together soon throws him out. Even though he may be sitting in the midst of the Order of bhikkhus, yet he is far from the Order and the Order is far from him. This is the third wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline....

(4) "Just as whatever great rivers there are ... on reaching the great ocean lose their former names and identities and are just called 'the great ocean,' so also (those of) the four castes -- nobles, brahmans, merchants, and workers -- having gone forth from home to the homeless state in the Dhamma and Discipline made known by the Tathagata, abandon their former names and identities and are just called 'recluses, the followers of the Sakyan son.' This is the fourth wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline....

(5) "Just as, although the rivers of the world flow into the great ocean and showers of rain fall from the sky, no lessening or filling up of the great ocean is evident, so also, although many bhikkhus attain final Nibbana in the Nibbana-element with no residue left, no lessening or filling up of the Nibbana-element is evident. This is the fifth wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline....

(6) "Just as the great ocean has one taste, the taste of salt, so also this Dhamma and Discipline has one taste, the taste of liberation. This is the sixth wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline....

(7) "Just as the great ocean contains many precious substances, various precious substances ... so also this Dhamma and Discipline contains many precious things, various precious things, such as these: the four foundations of mindfulness, the four right endeavours, the four bases for successful accomplishment, the five faculties, the five powers, the seven enlightenment factors, and the Noble Eightfold Path. This is the seventh wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline....

(8) "Just as the great ocean is the abode of mighty creatures ... so also this Dhamma and Discipline is the abode of mighty creatures, such as these: the stream-enterer and the one who is on the way to realizing the fruit of stream-entry, the once-returner and the one who is on the way to realizing the fruit of once-returning, the non-returner and the one who is on the way to realizing the fruit of non-returning, the arahat and the one who is on the way to arahatship. This is the eighth wonderful and marvellous quality in this Dhamma and Discipline.

"These, bhikkhus, are the eight wonderful and marvellous qualities in this Dhamma and Discipline, seeing which bhikkhus delight in this Dhamma and Discipline."

Then, on realizing its significance, the Lord uttered on that occasion this inspired utterance:

Rain soddens what is covered up,
It does not sodden what is open.
Therefore uncover what is covered
That the rain will not sodden it.

---o0o---

Udana V.6

Sona Sutta

About Sona

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time Ven. MahaKaccanawas living among the people of Avanti on Pavatta Mountain near the Osprey Habitat. And at that time the lay follower Sona Kotikanna was Ven. MahaKaccana's supporter. Then as Sona Kotikanna was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to his awareness: "According to the Dhamma Master MahaKaccana teaches, it's not easy living at home to practice the celibate life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?"

So he went to Ven. MahaKaccana and on arrival, having bowed down to Ven. MahaKaccana, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to Ven. MahaKaccana, "Just now, venerable sir, as I was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to my awareness: 'According to the Dhamma Master MahaKaccana teaches, it's not easy living at home to practice the celibate life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?' Give me the going-forth, Master MahaKaccana!"

When this was said, Ven. MahaKaccana said to Sona Kotikanna, "It's hard, Sona, the life-long, one-meal-a-day, sleeping-alone celibate life. Please, right there as you are a householder, devote yourself to the message of the Awakened Ones and to the proper-time [i.e., uposatha day] one-meal-a-day, sleeping-alone celibate life." And so Sona Kotikanna's idea of going-forth subsided.

Then a second time as Sona Kotikanna was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to his awareness: "According to the Dhamma Master MahaKaccana teaches, it's not easy living at home to practice the celibate life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?"

So he went to Ven. MahaKaccana and on arrival, having bowed down to Ven. MahaKaccana, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to Ven. MahaKaccana, "Just now, venerable sir, as I was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to my awareness: 'According to the Dhamma Master MahaKaccana teaches, it's not easy living at home to practice the celibate life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?' Give me the going-forth, Master MahaKaccana!"

When this was said, Ven. MahaKaccana said to Sona Kotikanna, "It's hard, Sona, the life-long, one-meal-a-day, sleeping-alone celibate life. Please, right there as you are a householder, devote yourself to the message of the Awakened Ones and to the proper-time [i.e., uposatha day] one-meal-a-day, sleeping-alone celibate life." And so Sona Kotikanna's idea of going-forth subsided a second time.

Then a third time as Sona Kotikanna was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to his awareness: "According to the Dhamma Master MahaKaccana teaches, it's not easy living at home to practice the celibate life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?"

So he went to Ven. MahaKaccana and on arrival, having bowed down to Ven. MahaKaccana, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to Ven. MahaKaccana, "Just now, venerable sir, as I was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to my awareness: 'According to the Dhamma Master MahaKaccana teaches, it's not easy living at home to practice the celibate life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?' Give me the going-forth, Master MahaKaccana!"

So Ven. MahaKaccana gave Sona Kotikanna the going-forth.

Now at that time the southern country of Avanti was short of monks. So only after three years -- having gathered from here & there with hardship & difficulty a quorum-of-ten community of monks [1] -- did Ven. MahaKaccana give full admission to Ven. Sona. Then, after having completed the Rains retreat, as he was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to Ven. Sona's awareness: "I haven't seen the Blessed One face-to-face. I have simply heard that he is like this and like that. If my preceptor would give me permission, I would go to see the Blessed One, the Worthy One, the Rightly Self-awakened One."

So, leaving seclusion in the late afternoon, he went to Ven. MahaKaccana and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to Ven. MahaKaccana, "Just now, venerable sir, as I was alone in seclusion, this train of thought arose to my awareness: 'I haven't seen the Blessed One face-to-face. I have simply heard that he is like this and like that. If my preceptor would give me permission, I would go to see the Blessed One, the Worthy One, the Rightly Self-awakened One.'"

"Good, good, Sona. Go, Sona, to see the Blessed One the Worthy One, the Rightly Self-awakened One. You will see the Blessed One who is serene & inspires serene confidence, whose senses are calmed, who has attained the utmost tranquillity & poise, a Great One (naga)who is controlled, tamed, restrained in his senses. On seeing him, showing reverence with your head to his feet in my name, ask whether he is free from illness & affliction, is carefree, strong, & living in comfort, [saying: 'My preceptor, lord, shows reverence with his head to your feet and asks whether you are free from illness & affliction, are carefree, strong, & living in comfort.'"] [2]

"As you say, venerable sir," replied Ven. Sona. Delighting in and approving of Ven. MahaKaccana's words, he got up from his seat, bowed down to Ven. MahaKaccana, circumambulated him, set his lodging in order, and taking his bowl & robes set off wandering toward Savatthi. Wandering by stages, he arrived at Savatthi, Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. He went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to the Blessed One, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to the Blessed One, "Lord, my preceptor, Ven. MahaKaccana, shows reverence with his head to the Blessed One's feet and asks whether the Blessed One is free from illness & affliction, is carefree, strong, & living in comfort."

"Are you well, monk? Are you in good health? Have you come along the road with only a little fatigue? And are you not tired of alms-food?"

"I am well, Blessed One. I am in good health, Blessed One. I have come along the road, lord, with only a little fatigue and I am not tired of alms-food."

Then the Blessed One addressed Ven. Ananda, [saying,] "Ananda, prepare bedding for this visiting monk."

Then the thought occurred to Ven. Ananda, "When the Blessed One orders me, 'Ananda, prepare bedding for this visiting monk,' he wants to stay in the same dwelling with that monk. The Blessed One wants to stay in the same dwelling with Ven. Sona." So he prepared bedding for Ven. Sona in the dwelling in which the Blessed One was staying. Then the Blessed One, having spent much of the night sitting in the open air, washed his feet and entered the dwelling. Likewise, Ven. Sona, having spent much of the night sitting in the open air, washed his feet and entered the dwelling. Then, getting up toward the end of the night, the Blessed One invited Ven. MahaSona, [3] [saying,] "Monk, I would like you to recite the Dhamma."

Responding, "As you say, lord," Ven. Sona chanted all sixteen parts of the Atthakavagga. The Blessed One, at the conclusion of Ven. Sona's chanting, was highly pleased [and said], "Good, good, monk. You have learned the Attakavagga [verses] well, have considered them well, have borne them well in mind. You have a fine delivery, clear & faultless, that makes the meaning intelligible. How many Rains [in the monkhood] do you have?"

"I have one Rains, lord."

"But why did you take so long [to ordain]?"

"For a long time, lord, I have seen the drawbacks in sensual passions, but the household life is crowded with many duties, many things to be done."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Seeing the drawbacks of the world,
knowing the state without acquisitions,
a noble one doesn't delight in evil,
in evil
a pure one doesn't delight.


Notes

1.Originally, a quorum of at least ten monks was required to ordain a new monk. In the version of this story given in the Vinaya (Mv.V.13.1-13), Ven. MahaKaccana sends requests to the Buddha via Ven. Sona that some of the Vinaya rules be relaxed outside of the middle Ganges valley, one of them being that the quorum required for ordination be reduced. As a result, the Buddha amended the relevant rule, stating that the quorum of ten was needed only within the middle Ganges valley, and that outside of the middle Ganges valley a quorum of five would be sufficient to ordain a new monk, provided that at least one of the five be knowledgeable in the Vinaya. [Go back]

2.The passage in brackets is in the PTS edition, but not in the Thai edition. [Go back]

3.This is the only point in the sutta where Ven. Sona has the prefix "Great" (Maha) added to his name. [Go back]

---o0o---

Udana V.7

Revata Sutta

About Revata

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time Ven. Revata the Doubter was sitting not far from the Blessed One, his legs crossed, his body held erect, reflecting on [his] purification through the overcoming of doubt. The Blessed One saw Ven. Revata the Doubter sitting not far away, his legs crossed, his body held erect, reflecting on [his] purification through the overcoming of doubt.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Any doubts,
about here or the world beyond,
about what is experienced
by/because of others,
by/because of oneself,
are abandoned -- all --
by the person in jhana,
ardent,
living the holy life.

---o0o---

Udana V.9

Saddayamana Sutta

Uproar

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was wandering among the Kosalans with a large community of monks. Now at that time, a large number of youths were making an uproar not far from the Blessed One. The Blessed One saw the large number of youths making an uproar not far away.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

False pundits, deluded,
saying nothing but words,
speaking as much as they like:
What leads them on
they don't know.

---o0o---

Udana V.10

Panthaka Sutta

About Cula Panthaka

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time Ven. Cula Panthaka was sitting not far from the Blessed One, his legs crossed, his body held erect, with mindfulness established to the fore. The Blessed One saw Ven. Cula Panthaka sitting not far away, his legs crossed, his body held erect, with mindfulness established to the fore.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

With steady body,
with steady awareness,
whether standing, sitting, or lying down,
a monk determined on mindfulness
gains one distinction
after another.
Having gained one distinction
after another,
he goes where the King of Death
can't see.

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