Tu Viện Quảng Đức105 Lynch Rd, Fawkner, Vic 3060. Australia. Tel: 9357 3544. quangduc@quangduc.com* Viện Chủ: TT Tâm Phương, Trụ Trì: TT Nguyên Tạng   

Winter newsletter of Buddhist Contemplative Care Tasmania

14/08/201413:13(Xem: 1937)
Winter newsletter of Buddhist Contemplative Care Tasmania
The Middleway_Tasmania
Date: Thu, Aug 14, 2014 at 1:02 PM

Dear Family and Friends
I am sending to you as an attachment the Winter newsletter of Buddhist Contemplative Care Tasmania (BCCT). I am doing this by way letting you know of one of the projects that form my life here in Tasmania.
BCCT had its beginnings in my little studio apartment in West Hobart late in 2011. After much nurturing, it is growing into something of a movement with a number of very committed members here and the hope of building an organisation potentially called Buddhist Contemplative Care Australia with chapters in Adelaide and Victoria.
It involves a lot of work on the part of a few people. In a sense it is like a small business in which all of us are on the look out, at least in an unconscious way, for opportunities to give expression to our purpose which is to support the growth of Buddhist Contemplative Care (sometimes called Pastoral Care) in Tasmania and throughout the rest of Australia.
I hope you can rejoice with me in this work done here,
Best wishes
Thich Thong Phap / Peter Hawkins.


View_PDF file_BCCT Winter newsletter


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