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AGM March 24 2015 at Chenrezig Institute, Sunshine Coast, Queensland

ASA_Queensland_2015 (40)

bringthesanghatogether2015

 

 

Australian Sangha Association Conference and AGM

 Date and Venue:

 This year the ASA annual conference and AGM will be held on Tuesday March 24th 2015 at Chenrezig Institute, 33 Johnsons Road, Eudlo, Queensland 4554.

 Sangha members are encouraged to arrive on the 23rd or earlier and register at 7.30am on the 24th.

 About the Conference & AGM:

 The ASA annual conference brings together Buddhist monastics of all traditions living in, or visiting Australia, for fellowship, dialogue and to address the issues facing Buddhism in Australia. The ASA has in previous years, and is still working with the Department of Immigration & Border Security to assist those monastic’s seeking Permanent Residency Visas through representations to the Federal Government. Where appropriate, the ASA has and continues to consult with state Buddhist Councils and Federation of Australian Buddhist Councils (FABC) for a solution to these ongoing issues. The ASA has arranged monastic education forums such as the 2010 Vinaya Conference, and represents the Australian Sangha community at various International Conferences, as well as consultations with various State & Federal Government agencies.

 

Program

 6: 30am Group Meditation

7:00am Breakfast

7:30am Registration

8:00am Welcome Ceremony

 8:20am Introduction and Welcome

 8:40 – 9:40am Visa Applications for foreign Monastics presented by Ajahn Brahm

 9:40am Morning tea

 10:00 – 11:15am AGM

 11:15 – 12:15 Lunch

 12:15 – 1:30pm Keynote speaker from Chenrezig Venerable Tenzin Tsapel (TBC)

 1:45 – 3:00pm Buddhist Chaplaincy presented by Ven. Hojun

 3:00 – 3:30pm Afternoon tea

 3:45 – 4:00pm Closing ceremony

 

 

 

Transport:

 

Travelling By Car

 

Turn off the Bruce highway at Tourist Drive 25 (Exit 200, Forest Glen/ Chevallum).

 Immediately turn left onto Chevallum Road.

 After 6 km, turn left onto Eudlo Road.

 After about 4 km, pass through Eudlo, over the cross roads and onto Highlands Road.

 Travel along Highlands Road for 4 km, and turn left onto Rambert Road.

 After 2 km, take the left fork to Chenrezig Institute.

 Travelling By Public Transport

 This is a 15 zone journey.

 go card adult $13.78, off-peak $11.03

 go card concession $6.89, off-peak $5.52

 Single paper adult $20.00, single paper concession $10.00

 Off-peak = 8.30am to 3.30pm and 7pm to 3am M-F, all day weekends and public holidays.

 The go card is Brisbane’s integrated public transport (train, bus, ferry) ticketing system, an electronic swipe card.

 Credit can be put on the card by any person carrying the card. There is a $5 deposit for the card. Concession usually is for pensioners or full time students.

 The train trip takes one and a half to two hours. A train timetable can be viewed at the Transinfo website or please contact them on 131 230 for information. You can use http://jp.translink.com.au/ and put in from Central Station (or any you chose) to Eudlo Station.

 Once you have arrived at the Eudlo train station, taxis are available for transport up to Chenrezig (approximately $20). However, to avoid a possibly long wait, it is advised to pre-book your taxi as soon as you know the arrival time of your train, on 131008.

 The ASA and FABC is making arrangements to transport monastic and lay supporter groups from Brisbane airport to Chenrezig via mini-bus or similar.

 If you require transport from Brisbane airport to Chenrezig and back you are asked to apply as soon as possible in order to facilitate the co-ordination of vehicles. This trip is approximately 1.5 hours.

 Transport from Brisbane airport to Chenrezig on Monday 23 March 2015:

 Mid-morning, lunchtime and mid-afternoon? (TBC)

 Transport to Brisbane airport will be offered on completion of the AGM Tuesday 24 March 2015: Early evening? (TBC)

 Transport to Brisbane airport will also be offered during the morning Wednesday 25 March 2015:

 Early morning and possibly after lunch depending on numbers? (TBC)

 In consideration of our planning of your transportation needs, please book your flights accordingly.

 

 

 

Accommodation Details:

 

Please Note: the events coordinator at Chenrezig prefers to manage the accommodation booking in a single block event. Participants (monastics and lay), are cordially asked to provide their relevant registration details to Venerable Tenpa Bejanke, who will forward them on as a single group booking

 Individuals are not to book Chenrezig accommodation privately.

 Chenrezig Institute is happy to offer accommodation and lunch to all Sangha members free of charge. If other meals are taken they are offered at a reduced cost. All meals are Vegetarian.

 Breakfast $6 and Supper $4

 For lay participants the costs are the standard rates:

 Dorm room $25

 Single room $32

 Shared room $45

 Retreat hut with shared bathroom $60

 Self-contained retreat hut $70

 Breakfast $8, Lunch $12.50 and Supper $6.50

 Participants are asked to please contact Ven. Tenpa Bejanke, as soon as possible so that all transport, health, meals and accommodation needs can be met.

 Sponsorship:

 Sponsorship is available for interstate participants who need assistance with travel expenses. Please contact

 asasecretary@gmail.com

 Donations:

 Our funding comes entirely from your generosity and donations towards the costs of the conference are welcome. Please make cheques payable to ‘Australian Sangha Association’ and post to ASA Treasurer: Venerable Ajahn Brahm, P.O.BOX 475, Serpentine, WA. 6125

 

 

 

Membership:

 Most Buddhist monks and nuns living in Australia are eligible to apply for ASA membership. If you are a member, you can participate fully in the conference, including voting for the new committee and other key decisions. Make your membership application online at the ASA website now to ensure your membership is approved in time for the conference. If you cannot access the Internet, please contact us and we will post you a membership application form.

 All Enquiries:

 Venerable Tenpa Bejanke

 ASA acting Secretary

 Tel: 0412 989 155

 Email: asasecretary@gmail.com

 Venerable Tenpa Bejanke

 P.O. Box 3617

 Manuka ACT 2603


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