Tu Viện Quảng Đức105 Lynch Rd, Fawkner, Vic 3060. Australia. Tel: 9357 3544. quangduc@quangduc.com* Viện Chủ: TT Tâm Phương, Trụ Trì: TT Nguyên Tạng   

A Young People's Life of the Buddha

19/02/201116:12(Xem: 2524)
A Young People's Life of the Buddha

A Young People's 
Life of the Buddha

Bhikkhu Silacara

---o0o--- 
ayoungpeoplelifeofthebuddha_silacara
Content


Part 1: 
I. Birth
II. Boyhood
III. Youth
IV. Leaving Home

Part 2: 
V. Compassion
VI. First Endeavors
VII. Success

Part 3: 
VIII. Making Known the Teaching
IX. Sigala
X. Sariputta and Moggallana
XI. Kapilavatthu

Part 4: 
XII. Daily Life
XIII. Mahapajapati
XIV. Wonder-working

Part 5: 
XV. Discourses
XVI. The Kindness of the Buddha
XVII. Devadatta
XVIII. Mahaparinibbana

 

 

About the Author:

Bhikkhu Silacara: A Biography

In 1906 a Scotsman in his thirty-fifth year, known as J.F. McKechnie, was admitted to the Sangha by the Thera U Kumara at Kyun Daw Gone Kyaung (Temple), Kemmendine, Rangoon, Burma. He was given the Bhikku's name of Silacara.

The new monk had come to the country about the beginning of this century, having, whilst in Glasgow, read about Buddhism in a copy of the magazine //Buddhism// which he found in the public library, and answered an advertisement of its editor the Bhikkhu Ananda Metteyya (Alan Bennett, in lay life) for one with literary ability to assist him in the editorial work in Rangoon. McKechnie remained with the British Buddhist monk until the magazine ceased publication. Then, prior to his own entering the Sangha as noted above, he taught for a year in the Buddhist boys' school of Mme Hla Oung.

The future Bhikkhu was born in Hull, Yorkshire, on October 22nd, 1871. His father was a famous baritone singer, Sir Charles Santley, and his mother was Caroline Mavis. After the years of schooling, till he was 21, he worked as apprentice to the trade of Stock-cutter in a clothing factory, emigrating therefrom to America to work for four years on a fruit and dairy farm.

The Bhikkhu Silacara worked untiringly, writing, preaching, traveling. He once went on a mission to Sikkim, on the Maharajah's invitation, but the mission bore hardly any fruit owing to the point of view of the lamas who thought that pure Buddhism would be corrupted, if in the hands of the ignorant peasant. He broke down in health, contracting nervous asthma, complicated with heart trouble, and on the advice of the German Buddhist Dr. P. Dahlke, left the robes and for England late in 1925. Here he worked with the Anagarika Dharmapala at the Mahabodhi Society's British branch, lecturing and editing the //British Buddhist//. His health suffered again and in 1932 when he had to leave London to live in Surrey. But he never ceased to work, for he wrote to Buddhist Magazines in the country, in Ceylon, Burma, Germany, etc.

During World War II his little retreat Wisboro Green having been sold, he entered an Old Persons' Home at Bury, where he, who had led the austere life of a Buddhist monk, bore the hard way of a state charitable institution with equanimity until his death three years ago.

Of the books on Buddhism which he wrote, those perhaps best known to Ceylon Buddhists are //The Four Noble Truths//, //The Eightfold Path//, //Kamma//, //Lotus Blossoms//. In the early twenties Ceylon readers of the //Buddhist Chronicle//, a paper started by Mr. P. de. S. Kularatne, the Principal of Ananda College, Colombo, were greatly encouraged by the vigorous contribution which the Bhikkhu made regularly. The interest of these articles was heightened specially by the fact that there was a controversy going on at that time, the leader on the Buddhist side being American Buddhist Scholar of Mahayana, Dr. W. Y. Evans-Wentz //Buddhist Annual of Ceylon//.

The Bhikkhu also contributed a number of articles to the //Buddhist Annual of Ceylon// an illustrated magazine of a high order which the firm Messrs. W. E. Bastain & Co. of Colombo were publishing with great acceptance to places and people all over the world wherever Orientalia found welcome, and these were a formidable tally. For this Firm he specially wrote the //Young People's Life of the Buddha// the popularity of which remains undimmed throughout the decades in which it is being re-printed.

Colombo, 15th January 1953


Copyright 1995 Singapore Buddhist Meditation Centre 
No. 11, Neo Pee Teck Lane 
Singapore 0511

* * *

DharmaNet Edition 1995

Transcription: Bradford Griffith; Proofreading: Jane Yudelman; Formatting: John Bullitt

This electronic edition is offered for free distribution via DharmaNet by arrangement with the publisher.

DharmaNet International 
P.O. Box 4951, 
Berkeley 
CA 94704-4951 - USA

---o0o---

Content | Part 01 | Part 02 | Part 03 | Part 04 | Part 05 |

---o0o--- 

Source : Buddhasasana homepage

Update : 01-05-2002



Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
04/03/201112:25(Xem: 2771)
The other major challenge to orthodox Vedism was founded by the son of a chief of a region called the Shakyas. This region lay among the foothills of the Himalayas in the farthest northern regions of the plains of India in Nepal.
01/12/201009:48(Xem: 1748)
Peace lives the heart and soul of every human being, with mindfulness being the key to opening its door. The Jade Buddha shows you your reflection and reminds you that peace is within you, not around you.
03/03/201109:35(Xem: 1495)
There was a small country in what is now southern Nepal that was ruled by a clan called the Shakyas. The head of this clan, and the king of this country, was named Shuddodana Gautama, and his wife was the beautiful Mahamaya. Mahamaya was expecting her first born. She had had a strange dream in which a baby elephant had blessed her with his trunk, which was understood to be a very auspicious sign to say the least.
21/02/201104:48(Xem: 1662)
Lord Buddha, the Sakyan Prince, the real refuge of all men, devas and brahmas, had fulfilled the ten perfections (Parami) since the life of Sumedha. Four Asankhyeyyas and one hundred-thousand world-cycles ago, the future Buddha named Sumedha was the only son of a rich man at Amaravati, the Royal City. He came of rich parental lineage, both of whom were pure in morality and race.
21/02/201114:38(Xem: 4076)
I was the first reader of the Life of the Buddha written by Mrs. Radhika Abeysekera. She presents the Dhamma to children in a very attractive way. On the day I was in Winnipeg, I understood the value of her voluntary gift of Dhamma (Dhammadana) to the children.
25/02/201113:02(Xem: 2034)
This uplifting poem has always been one for our favourites, so it's lovely to see this new and well-bound edition. Though written more than a hundred years ago, it still retains the power to move us in a way that no prose rendering of the life of the Buddha can. Its vivid, jewelled language makes us see the eagle wheeling in the sky, the snake beneath the rock,the moonlight shining on the floor while all in the palace sleep. The spreading branches of the Tree of Wisdom...And we cannot but admire the courage, determination and self-sacrifice of the Indian price who, out of compassion, left his palace to find a remedy for the sufferings of the world.
01/05/201411:37(Xem: 2440)
I extend my greetings to participants of the 11th Anniversary Celebrations and International Buddhist Conference on the United Nations Day of Vesak 2014, being hosted by the National Vietnam Buddhist Sangha (NVBS).
27/03/201706:57(Xem: 20395)
The Seeker's Glossary of Buddhism By Sutra Translation Committee of USA/Canada This is a revised and expanded edition of The Seeker's Glossary of Buddhism. The text is a compendium of excerpts and quotations from some 350 works by monks, nuns, professors, scholars and other laypersons from nine different countries, in their own words or in translation. The editors have merely organized the material, adding a few connecting thoughts of their own for ease in reading.
29/10/201015:41(Xem: 1362)
Gautama the Buddha was born in northern India about 2,500 years ago. The exact place of his birth is understood to be the Lumbini Garden...
03/03/201109:07(Xem: 1533)
Gautama the Buddha was born in northern India about 2,500 years ago. The exact place of his birth is understood to be the Lumbini Garden, which nowadays lies just inside the border of the little Himalayan kingdom of Nepal.