Tu Viện Quảng Đức105 Lynch Rd, Fawkner, Vic 3060. Australia. Tel: 9357 3544. quangduc@quangduc.com* Viện Chủ: TT Tâm Phương, Trụ Trì: TT Nguyên Tạng   

Good Question, Good Answer

06/05/201109:47(Xem: 2372)
Good Question, Good Answer
goodquestion_goodanswer

Contents

-ooOoo-

[01] What is Buddhism ?
[02] Basic Buddhist Concept
[03] Buddhism and the God-idea
[04] The Five Precepts
[05] Rebirth
[06] Meditation
[07] Wisdom and Compassion
[08] Vegetarianism
[09] Good Luck and Fate
[10] Scriptures
[11] Monk & Nuns
[12] Becoming a Buddhist

[13] Basic Buddhism: A Five-Minute Introduction

-ooOoo-

Preface

This book was first written in 1987 in response to the increasing interest in Buddhism amongst Singaporeans. To my surprise and delight, it has turned out to be very successful. The Buddha Dhamma Mandala Society, Singapore, alone has printed 30,000 copies and it has been translated into several languages including Tamil, Chinese and Nepali. Requests to for copies have come from as far away as Australia, Argentina and the Seychelle Islands. In July this year, I visited a remote hermitage high in the Himalayas in Ladakh only to discover that the abbot had not only read Good Question, Good Answer but greatly appreciated it. All this had convinced me that this little book's
style and contents has filled an important need and that revision and enlargement would enhance its value. Hence this new edition. Those wishing to reprint "Good Question, Good Answer" or translate it may do so without writing for permission. However, we would appreciate it if you send us two copies and let us know how many copies have been printed.

Ven. S. Dhammika
Singapore 1991

[See Vietnamese version]


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